caribou

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Caribou

(kâr`ĭbo͞o), town (1990 pop. 9,415), Aroostook co., NE Maine, on the Aroostook River; inc. 1859. A processing and shipping hub for a potato-growing region, it is also a winter sports center. Nearby Loring Air Force Base, once important to the local economy, is now closed; part of the base is now the Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge.

caribou,

name in North America for the genus (Rangifer) of deer from which the Old World reindeerreindeer,
ruminant mammal, genus Rangifer, of the deer family, found in arctic and subarctic regions of Eurasia and North America. It is the only deer in which both sexes have antlers.
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 was originally domesticated. Caribou are found in arctic and subarctic regions. They are the only deer in which both sexes have antlers. The broad hooves support the animal (males may weigh over 300 lb/130 kg) on boggy land or snow and have sharp edges that enable it to traverse rocky or frozen surfaces and to dig down to the grass and lichens on which it sometimes feeds. In North America there are several subspecies but two main types: the woodland caribou of the bogs and coniferous forests from Newfoundland to British Columbia, with palmate antlers up to 4 ft (120 cm) wide; and the barren-ground caribou of the tundra of Alaska, N Canada, and Greenland, which has many-branched, slender antlers and which may undertake mass migrations in search of food. Caribou are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Artiodactyla, family Cervidae.

Caribou

 

the common name for the North American speciesof the wild reindeer. There are forest and tundra caribou. Theforest caribou are larger and are distributed in the taiga; thetundra caribou are smaller and inhabit the open tundra, comingto the taiga only in winter.

caribou

a large deer, Rangifer tarandus, of Arctic regions of North America, having large branched antlers in the male and female: also occurs in Europe and Asia, where it is called a reindeer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, our combined model is based on five postulates: (1) in the absence of predation or when predators are controlled, caribou and moose populations are regulated by competition for food (Messier 1994, Crete and Manseau 1996); (2) in the presence of wolves, the moose population is regulated by wolf predation (Messier 1994); (3) wolf numbers are determined by moose abundance (Messier 1994), but there is no dependance of wolves on caribou numbers (Seip 1991); (4) caribou predation increases non-linearly with wolf abundance (Bergerud and Elliot 1986); and (5) there is no immigration or emigration in the system or these two opposite processes are equal.
Due to the paucity of woodland caribou population dynamics data, maximum growth rate and food carrying capacity were taken from published data for barren-ground caribou.
Carrying capacity based on availability of terrestrial lichens was estimated at 20 caribou per 100 [km.
As for caribou, these estimates were the only ones available for the Quebec boreal forest.
The impact of wolves on the caribou population was estimated using the Bergerud and Elliot (1986) density-independent model that was based on 17 North American studies.
Preliminary simulations were performed on caribou and moose populations separately using the logistic model.
Everyone seems to agree that the caribou need help, but opinions about how to provide it differ greatly.
Many people have the impression that if you don't touch the forest, it will be okay [for caribou and other animals]," she adds.
Logging and maintaining caribou habitat are not mutually exclusive," adds Idaho state game biologist Wayne Wakkinen.
Some independent biologists and environmentalists think good management means leaving caribou forests alone.
By cutting trees in old-growth forests, federal and state agencies have "failed to integrate the needs of woodland caribou and all sensitive, threatened, and endangered species in the ecosystem," he adds.
She says the agency is now using the results of recent studies and new technology "to plan on the ground management" for caribou and the ecosystem.