caribou

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Caribou

(kâr`ĭbo͞o), town (1990 pop. 9,415), Aroostook co., NE Maine, on the Aroostook River; inc. 1859. A processing and shipping hub for a potato-growing region, it is also a winter sports center. Nearby Loring Air Force Base, once important to the local economy, is now closed; part of the base is now the Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge.

caribou,

name in North America for the genus (Rangifer) of deer from which the Old World reindeerreindeer,
ruminant mammal, genus Rangifer, of the deer family, found in arctic and subarctic regions of Eurasia and North America. It is the only deer in which both sexes have antlers.
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 was originally domesticated. Caribou are found in arctic and subarctic regions. They are the only deer in which both sexes have antlers. The broad hooves support the animal (males may weigh over 300 lb/130 kg) on boggy land or snow and have sharp edges that enable it to traverse rocky or frozen surfaces and to dig down to the grass and lichens on which it sometimes feeds. In North America there are several subspecies but two main types: the woodland caribou of the bogs and coniferous forests from Newfoundland to British Columbia, with palmate antlers up to 4 ft (120 cm) wide; and the barren-ground caribou of the tundra of Alaska, N Canada, and Greenland, which has many-branched, slender antlers and which may undertake mass migrations in search of food. Caribou are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Artiodactyla, family Cervidae.

Caribou

 

the common name for the North American speciesof the wild reindeer. There are forest and tundra caribou. Theforest caribou are larger and are distributed in the taiga; thetundra caribou are smaller and inhabit the open tundra, comingto the taiga only in winter.

caribou

a large deer, Rangifer tarandus, of Arctic regions of North America, having large branched antlers in the male and female: also occurs in Europe and Asia, where it is called a reindeer.
References in periodicals archive ?
We examined several lines of evidence (body size, diet quality, location of caribou, and distributions of all-terrain vehicle and caribou tracks) across space, over time, or, when possible, both (Table 1).
Migratory (forest-tundra) SHB caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) bridge a gap between two kinds of caribou: genetically, these animals correspond with woodland (also known as sedentary or boreal) caribou, but in behaviour, they correspond with migratory tundra caribou to the north (McQuade-Smith, 2009; COSEWIC, 2011; Klutsch et al.
In the boreal forest, the carrying capacity for caribou is not precisely known.
Caribou densities in the boreal forest (1-3 per 100 [km.
Changes in technology and land use create a dynamic tension in the trust levels that aboriginal caribou hunters, biologists and managers have in their own observations--and in the exchange of their knowledge with each other.
Adapting Ostrom's (1994) insights to the case of caribou co-management, the work involved in creating viable management systems should include:
Beginning in the late 1970s, Inuit hunters reported more caribou sightings on southern and central Victoria Island, and by the mid 1970s, a few Dolphin and Union caribou were crossing on the sea ice to the mainland (Gunn et al.
An assessment by COSEWIC (2004) classified the Dolphin and Union caribou as a "Special Concern" species on the basis of herd size, harvest levels, and possible threats, including deaths during sea-ice crossings.
Those remaining Peary caribou now potentially face additional future uncertainties from climate change and pervasive negative changes in their environment (Maxwell, 1997; Weller, 2000; Comiso, 2002; Miller and Gunn, 2003b; Miller et al.
Peary caribou and muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) are the only two ungulates that have established themselves on the QEI.
The image of caribou strolling through a mountain forest clashes with the more commonly held notion of these ungulates thundering across the open tundra of the far north.
Woodland caribou rely on this odd association of algae and fungus to provide them with enough energy to make it through the long winter.