caries


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caries

progressive decay of a bone or a tooth

Caries

 

a pathological process involving the gradual destruction of bony tissue or teeth.

Caries of bony tissue is caused by degeneration or infection of bone or periosteum that results in necrosis of portions of bone followed by absorption or disengagement of the dead tissues and formation of a bone ulcer. Caries may also be accompanied by specific inflammatory processes (for example, tuberculosis or syphilis). The mechanism of development and clinical symptoms of caries vary with the cause, location of the focus, and so forth. In acute inflammations (for example, osteomyelitis), when a focus of suppuration arises in bone and sometimes spreads to the surrounding tissues, caries is manifested by systemic intoxication, and bone destruction progresses rapidly. In chronic and especially specific processes, caries develops slowly without severely pronounced symptoms. Treatment consists in medication (antibiotics, sulfanilamides) and specific treatment (anti-syphilitic, antituberculotic). Surgery is frequently effective.

caries

[′kar·ēz]
(medicine)
Bone decay.
Tooth decay. Also known as dental caries.
References in periodicals archive ?
National Research Council concluded around 1950 that vitamin D was beneficial in managing dental caries.
This study revealed that the caries and periodontal index values of the children who were blind were significantly higher than were those of the sighted children, even though both groups live in the same socioeconomic district in Istanbul.
Data on the knowledge of principles of dental caries prevention are presented in Table 1.
For caries to develop, three factors must be present at the same time:
This is a risk factor for caries formation and impacts to some degree on the ability to self-care.
For our examination the teeth were dry by the unit air spray and we considered as caries the lesions with soft base and the white spots also.
New components to the original program include caries risk and tobacco assessments and the supporting prevention interventions such as fluoride.
Caries are the result of infectious disease, and if they remain untreated--in children or adults--they can cause abscesses outside the tooth, affect developing teeth in children, and even affect facial structures such as the jaw, said Dr.
5,18) Dental caries is the most common chronic infectious disease of childhood and may be the most prevalent disease to affect humans.
With proper management and intervention, early forms of tooth decay -- known as caries -- can actually be stopped and reversed.
Xylitol inhibits or arrests growth of certain bacteria that is responsible for dental caries which belongs to the family of Gram Positive Streptococci Mutans (by reducing and interrupting the acid production of bacteria).