carnivorous

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Related to Carnivory: carnivorous

carnivorous

[kär′niv·ə·rəs]
(biology)
Eating flesh or, as in plants, subsisting on nutrients obtained from animal protoplasm.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relative balance of the cost and benefit associated with carnivory in the tropical Utricularia foliosa.
The failure to find a mate is an equally effective form of biological death as is that of carnivory or the death which results from starvation, malnutrition, parasitic disease, or accident.
Schiesari L, Werner EE, Kling GW (2009) Carnivory and resource-based niche differentiation in anuran larvae: implications for food web and experimental ecology.
Evolution and Consequences of Modern Carnivory (Wi ley-Blackwell, 2013) | Made in the USA: The Rise and Retreat of American Manufacturing (MIT Press, 2013) | Harvesting the Biosphere:What We Have Taken from Nature (MIT Press, 2013) | Japan's Dietary Transition and Its Impacts (MIT Press, 2011; with K.
In the animal microbiome, the researchers noted, studies comparing large numbers of species have shown that host diet -- for example, herbivory versus carnivory -- has a large effect on the structure of microbial communities in their guts.
Manitoba, Canada) approaches the phenomenon of human carnivory from both the nutritional/evolutionary perspective and the perspective of environmental impacts from modern meat production, with an eye toward hard numbers and critical examination of commonly cited documents.
In two separate treatises--published in 1875 and 1880, respectively--Darwin produced some of the earliest work on both carnivory and movement in plants, also bringing the implications of these phenomena to the attention of a wide audience for the first time.
In a comparison of 67 mammalian species, including humans, apes, mice, and killer whales, among many others, researchers from Lund University in Sweden found a clear correlation between carnivory and earlier weaning.
This is the case for atmospheric species in the tillandsioids (Tomlinson, 1970), aroid vines such as Monstera tuberculata, which produces only saucer-shaped leaves throughout their life time (Lee & Richards, 1991), life-long carnivorous plants as descendents of species, in which carnivory was originally restricted to the early stages of ontogeny as in a few extant species (Barthlott et al.