Cartularies

(redirected from cartulary)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to cartulary: Chartularius

Cartularies

 

collections of copies of the documents legally registering gifts, primarily of land, for the use of the church in medieval Western Europe. Copies of royal grants and sometimes copies of agreements between secular persons were also included in the cartularies. The copies did not always agree with the originals. The earliest examples of cartularies date to the late seventh and the eighth centuries; they ceased to be compiled in the late 13th and the 14th centuries. The cartularies of the large monasteries often contain thousands of documents. Cartularies are one of the most important sources for the investigation of the social and economic processes of the feudal countryside. Such data as the size and structure of the landholdings of the various social strata, the duties of the peasants, and the means by which the feudal dependence of the peasants was formed can be determined from the cartularies.

In the broadest sense, cartularies were understood in the Middle Ages to be collections of any sort of documents.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The cartulary, which dates from the 15th century, was last heard of in 1735, two hundred years after the dissolution of the monastery, and had missed being catalogued by the Historical Manuscripts Commission in the 19th century.
Hassall, "Plays at Clerkenwell," Modern La nguage Review 33 (1938): 564-67, prints the documents; the king's writ is also in The Cartulary of St.
Selecting 230 documents from the Hospitaller cartulary of 1442, Gervers presents an exceptional collection of source-material which covers the twelfth to the fourteenth centuries and illumines the connections between the English countryside and the religious order of St.
In a charter recorded in the cartulary of Saint Victor of Marseille dating from the twelfth century, a cross fixed on an oak tree was used to mark the limits of a territory or fields: quercum in qua crux fixa est (Guerard 1857).
Emilia Jamroziak studies the Rievaulx cartulary and suggests that it was used as a means of memorializing the abbey's benefactors.
Ek 1972), but it is in a fifteenth-century cartulary, in the same part of Dorset as most of the -y- spellings, so probably to be seen as just a scribal error.
9) The cartulary of Sint-Truiden testifies to the fact that William of Ryckel maintained his connection to William of Holland, for several documents appear from the Holy Roman Emperor to Abbot William.
The Pakenham Cartulary for the Manor of Ixworth Thorpe, Suffolk, c.
With Old English there is the additional complication that most of the anchor texts, which are charter boundaries, are not extant in contemporary manuscripts, so one has to keep a weather eye open for possible contamination by cartulary copyists; but that is not usually a problem, because cartularies up to the mid-thirteenth century on the whol e copy tenth- and eleventh-century texts more accurately than do tenth-and eleventh-century literary manuscripts.
In her discerning study of the Rievaulx cartulary and its records of the abbey's history during its first century and a half, Emilia Jamroziak has produced a mirror of the world of the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries that has value not only for monastic, but also for social, historians.
One set of sources stems from Gregory of Catino, who composed, between 1092 and 1132, four crucial texts: The Register, a cartulary of the monastery's landholdings; the Liber largitorius, a detailed list of the abbey's rental incomes; the Liber floriger, a comprehensive index to the Register; and the Chronicle, a chatty and informative history of the house from the late seventh century to the early twelfth.