caryatid


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caryatid

(kăr'ēăt`ĭd, kăr`ēətĭd'), a sculptured female figure serving as an ornamental support in place of a column or pilaster. It was a frequently used motif in architecture, furniture, and garden sculpture during the Renaissance, the 18th cent., and notably, the classic revivalclassic revival,
widely diffused phase of taste (known as neoclassic) which influenced architecture and the arts in Europe and the United States during the last years of the 18th and the first half of the 19th cent.
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 of the 19th cent., when caryatids were popular as mantelpiece supports. The motif appeared in Egyptian and Greek architecture; the most celebrated example extant is the Porch of the Caryatids, forming part of the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
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. Here six beautifully sculptured figures, acting as columns, support an entablature on their heads; the original figures are now in the Acropolis Museum. Caryatids were used also in two small treasuries (6th cent. B.C.) at Delphi. Male supporting figures are called atlantesatlantes
[Latin plural of Atlas], sculptured male figures serving as supports of entablatures, in place of a column or pier. The earliest (c.480–460 B.C.) and most important example from antiquity is in the Greek temple of Zeus at Agrigento, Sicily.
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Caryatid

A supporting member serving the function of a pier, column, or pilaster, and carved in the form of a draped, human figure; in Greek architecture.

Caryatid

 

(from the Greek karyatides, literally, the priestesses of the Temple of Artemis at Caryae, in Laconia, ancient Greece), in architecture, the sculptural representation of a standing female figure, serving as the support of a beam. Sometimes the figure only gives the impression of fulfilling a supportive function and simply serves as a decoration of the actual support. Caryatids were widely used in ancient Greek and Roman architecture, as well as in European architecture of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

caryatid

A supporting member serving the function of a pier, column, or pilaster and carved or molded in the form of a draped, human, female figure. See canephora.

caryatid

a column, used to support an entablature, in the form of a draped female figure
References in periodicals archive ?
That manifested itself in particular along the lines of a most distinct and characteristic feeling, to which I was subject with decreasing frequency; it was that I was making myself out to be a very mobile caryatid, or rather, a very lively atlas, admittedly not having to support or bear up a house, a gateway, or a bow window on his shoulders, but in place of burdens like those, however, I bore one the weight of which was assuredly not to be underestimated by comparison, one whose uttermost scale was unimaginably overwhelming to me, one accompanying me faithfully in all my comings and goings: a column of air that reached from my shoulders all the way up to the final, outermost membrane of the atmosphere's roof beams, a burden that had recently been growing ever more wearisome to me.
The examination of one of the most elaborate forms from the repertoire of Santarem vessels--the caryatid vessel--reveals the conception of a layered universe, organized along a vertical axis (Figure 1).
Ina caryatid we see the torso of a satyr and on the right the torso a nude women (see figure 20).
On the front cover, I see a detail of Duncan Grant's The Kitchen of 1914, with a dreamy woman's face at bottom left, cuddling a blue-eyed baby, a standing caryatid figure just above her, and behind her, a woman preparing something or other, her hands--putty-colored--in circular form above her head, while various goblets, bowls, and bottles sit upon a shelf.
Called The Fallen Caryatid Carrying Her Stone, it depicts a naked woman struggling to carry a heavy stone after it has crushed her.
Modigliani's drawing in blue crayon of a caryatid is wonderfully elegant; there are charming portraits by Degas of his sister, by Joshua Reynolds of a young ensign in the Royal Navy, by Corot of a woman reading, by Sisley of his son, Pierre, also reading, and by Veronese of a page boy.
The caryatids at each side of the proscenium arch were very probably permanent fixtures of the Teatro Argentina in the 1740s, but the caryatid theme has been repeated upstage on the six principal columns of the fantasy set representing the `reggio di Giove': a set in which Giuseppe Pannini has taken a typical High Baroque motif a la Galli Bibiena--a domed area from which lead avenues of arches half-right, half-left and full-centre(4)--and modified it by setting it high up in the clouds of Olympus, festooning it with garlands, making the central axis a second dome backed by a receding series of triumphal arches, and lighting the whole from behind with a rosy dawn glow.
What in his actual life could ever correspond to wild imaginings like a bridge collapsing on purpose to keep the narrator from jumping off it to his death, or the growth of intimacy between a man and a caryatid, one of those statues of a woman, so numerous in Vienna, holding up a doorway or a balcony?
A sculpture might merge an African primitive mask, a Greek caryatid, Mexican folk art images, a parrot or a Pierrot, along with animalistic horns and antlers.
In 1801 the Royal Navy received a message from Lord Elgin, ambassador in Athens, requesting a warship to carry off the caryatid porch of the Erectheum.