caryatid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

caryatid

(kăr'ēăt`ĭd, kăr`ēətĭd'), a sculptured female figure serving as an ornamental support in place of a column or pilaster. It was a frequently used motif in architecture, furniture, and garden sculpture during the Renaissance, the 18th cent., and notably, the classic revivalclassic revival,
widely diffused phase of taste (known as neoclassic) which influenced architecture and the arts in Europe and the United States during the last years of the 18th and the first half of the 19th cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
 of the 19th cent., when caryatids were popular as mantelpiece supports. The motif appeared in Egyptian and Greek architecture; the most celebrated example extant is the Porch of the Caryatids, forming part of the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Here six beautifully sculptured figures, acting as columns, support an entablature on their heads; the original figures are now in the Acropolis Museum. Caryatids were used also in two small treasuries (6th cent. B.C.) at Delphi. Male supporting figures are called atlantesatlantes
[Latin plural of Atlas], sculptured male figures serving as supports of entablatures, in place of a column or pier. The earliest (c.480–460 B.C.) and most important example from antiquity is in the Greek temple of Zeus at Agrigento, Sicily.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Caryatid

A supporting member serving the function of a pier, column, or pilaster, and carved in the form of a draped, human figure; in Greek architecture.

Caryatid

 

(from the Greek karyatides, literally, the priestesses of the Temple of Artemis at Caryae, in Laconia, ancient Greece), in architecture, the sculptural representation of a standing female figure, serving as the support of a beam. Sometimes the figure only gives the impression of fulfilling a supportive function and simply serves as a decoration of the actual support. Caryatids were widely used in ancient Greek and Roman architecture, as well as in European architecture of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

caryatid

A supporting member serving the function of a pier, column, or pilaster and carved or molded in the form of a draped, human, female figure. See canephora.

caryatid

a column, used to support an entablature, in the form of a draped female figure
References in periodicals archive ?
That was why my body was passed along the line from building to building, with as few gaps as possible, from caryatid to atlas (the masculine singular), for the purpose of disseminating my sleep concerts, slumber plays, dreamer serenades, fatigue tragedies, exhaustion comedies, all to be marveled at, with feelings running ever higher, as the ultimate or penultimate secret lighting up for them the transfiguring significance of their immobile existence, to the point of a mysterious dissolution of their universal formula for the petrifaction equation.
There is a world of difference between the way Wheeler's telamons and caryatids keep their formal watch above the Corinthian classicism of Herbert Baker's bank facade, and the way Gill's medievalist Prospero steps gently from the Jacobean stage to grace the entry to Broadcasting House.
Caryatid is the name given to a carved female figure which was used as a column support in grand French buildings.
Ina caryatid we see the torso of a satyr and on the right the torso a nude women (see figure 20).
Narcissa Benbow Sartoris, the widow of Miss Jenny's great-great nephew, is first seen from Elnora's perspective as "the big young woman in white" (728) and then, similarly, from Jenny's as "a large woman in her thirties, within the twilight something about her of that heroic quality of statuary" who crosses the room with "her white dress flowing slowly, heroic, like a caryatid from a temple facade come to life" (738).
What in his actual life could ever correspond to wild imaginings like a bridge collapsing on purpose to keep the narrator from jumping off it to his death, or the growth of intimacy between a man and a caryatid, one of those statues of a woman, so numerous in Vienna, holding up a doorway or a balcony?
A sculpture might merge an African primitive mask, a Greek caryatid, Mexican folk art images, a parrot or a Pierrot, along with animalistic horns and antlers.
He adored her, and in his memoirs evoked her luminous presence again and again, calling her "a goddess, a nymph, a caryatid, a creature enamored of the air.
The pitchers and the urns, which can transform a Picasso figure into a caryatid or a river goddess, become, in Leger's work, the implements of domestic, workaday life.
He also removed a caryatid from the Porch of the Maidens belonging to the Erechtheion a few steps north of the Parthenon .
The Nudist Museum Gift Shop, 2012, installed in the upstairs gallery, is also made up of paintings, each of them depicting flea market--type objects: three nude Graces forming the base for a lamp, a nude caryatid holding up a glass coffee table, mugs and flasks featuring disembodied torsos, breasts, and buttocks.