caryatid

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caryatid

(kăr'ēăt`ĭd, kăr`ēətĭd'), a sculptured female figure serving as an ornamental support in place of a column or pilaster. It was a frequently used motif in architecture, furniture, and garden sculpture during the Renaissance, the 18th cent., and notably, the classic revivalclassic revival,
widely diffused phase of taste (known as neoclassic) which influenced architecture and the arts in Europe and the United States during the last years of the 18th and the first half of the 19th cent.
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 of the 19th cent., when caryatids were popular as mantelpiece supports. The motif appeared in Egyptian and Greek architecture; the most celebrated example extant is the Porch of the Caryatids, forming part of the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
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. Here six beautifully sculptured figures, acting as columns, support an entablature on their heads; the original figures are now in the Acropolis Museum. Caryatids were used also in two small treasuries (6th cent. B.C.) at Delphi. Male supporting figures are called atlantesatlantes
[Latin plural of Atlas], sculptured male figures serving as supports of entablatures, in place of a column or pier. The earliest (c.480–460 B.C.) and most important example from antiquity is in the Greek temple of Zeus at Agrigento, Sicily.
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Caryatid

A supporting member serving the function of a pier, column, or pilaster, and carved in the form of a draped, human figure; in Greek architecture.

Caryatid

 

(from the Greek karyatides, literally, the priestesses of the Temple of Artemis at Caryae, in Laconia, ancient Greece), in architecture, the sculptural representation of a standing female figure, serving as the support of a beam. Sometimes the figure only gives the impression of fulfilling a supportive function and simply serves as a decoration of the actual support. Caryatids were widely used in ancient Greek and Roman architecture, as well as in European architecture of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

caryatid

A supporting member serving the function of a pier, column, or pilaster and carved or molded in the form of a draped, human, female figure. See canephora.

caryatid

a column, used to support an entablature, in the form of a draped female figure
References in periodicals archive ?
Once recovered from the stresses and strains of my sleep demonstrations, the first thing I wanted to do was go right back to the caryatids.
The Caryatids is a brave book, one that dances at the edge of despair and somehow never topples over the brink.
Hefner describes the care taken with the mosaic-like decorations as the restorers brought to life bird wings made of shells and red coral-lipped caryatids with green malachite and purple amethyst robes.
She obeisantly twines, unsustained, through his portraits of her, as submissively coiled as one of his caryatids.
If you look out through the upper front windows of No 13, behind the draped figures of the Coade stone caryatids and over the Fields, Soane's almost limitless ambitions are tangible in this room.
The tomb, measuring 500 meters (a third of a mile) in circumference and dug into a 30-meter (100-foot) high hill in Amphipolis, northern Greece, contains sculptures of sphinxes and caryatids, intricate mosaics and coins featuring the face of Alexander the Great.
Appropriately, then, the visitor's eye is inevitably drawn to the quasi-sacred hemicycle, the entrance to the unseen industrial structure of the central stacks, the "most mysterious and also most inventive of the new installations," as Le Coeur describes it, flanked by two imposing caryatids.
He passed tiny villages where black-clad women washed their linen in cisterns outside their doors or carried jars of water balanced on their heads, upright and graceful caryatids.
The love between man and statue, depicted in the same volume (and in somewhat different form in his Awakening to the Great Sleep War), comes about after the narrator, the man, has almost overdosed on sleeping tablets in his eagerness to show the caryatids and atlantes what sleep is, because they have no concept of such a thing.
No other city canmatch this incredible space with its horseshoe shaped balcony supported by caryatids - pillars disguised by Greek maidens.
The sculptures which Elgin spared have now been taken down and put in the Acropolis Museum here the remaining caryatids from the Porch of the Maidens now peer at visitors from behind glass.