caryatid

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caryatid

(kăr'ēăt`ĭd, kăr`ēətĭd'), a sculptured female figure serving as an ornamental support in place of a column or pilaster. It was a frequently used motif in architecture, furniture, and garden sculpture during the Renaissance, the 18th cent., and notably, the classic revivalclassic revival,
widely diffused phase of taste (known as neoclassic) which influenced architecture and the arts in Europe and the United States during the last years of the 18th and the first half of the 19th cent.
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 of the 19th cent., when caryatids were popular as mantelpiece supports. The motif appeared in Egyptian and Greek architecture; the most celebrated example extant is the Porch of the Caryatids, forming part of the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
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. Here six beautifully sculptured figures, acting as columns, support an entablature on their heads; the original figures are now in the Acropolis Museum. Caryatids were used also in two small treasuries (6th cent. B.C.) at Delphi. Male supporting figures are called atlantesatlantes
[Latin plural of Atlas], sculptured male figures serving as supports of entablatures, in place of a column or pier. The earliest (c.480–460 B.C.) and most important example from antiquity is in the Greek temple of Zeus at Agrigento, Sicily.
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Caryatid

A supporting member serving the function of a pier, column, or pilaster, and carved in the form of a draped, human figure; in Greek architecture.

Caryatid

 

(from the Greek karyatides, literally, the priestesses of the Temple of Artemis at Caryae, in Laconia, ancient Greece), in architecture, the sculptural representation of a standing female figure, serving as the support of a beam. Sometimes the figure only gives the impression of fulfilling a supportive function and simply serves as a decoration of the actual support. Caryatids were widely used in ancient Greek and Roman architecture, as well as in European architecture of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

caryatid

A supporting member serving the function of a pier, column, or pilaster and carved or molded in the form of a draped, human, female figure. See canephora.

caryatid

a column, used to support an entablature, in the form of a draped female figure
References in periodicals archive ?
So I tried that--I made them in stoneware at Guldagergaard to match the material of the caryatids.
Now for the specifics: you are the Singing Caryatids of the Malachite Hall.
The Caryatids is Sterling's first novel in five years.
The remaining forty brackets conform to a general design: each is composed of a major figure, a deity, a demigod, or an epic hero/heroine canopied by foliage, borne by a pair of caryatids, mainly a pair making love, ensconsed in a symbolic rocky setting.
Two female caryatids holding cornucopias of flowers and fruits flank a large-scale bronze Mercury, who appears to land on the basin (fig.
No such acoustic problems afflict the exquisite, horseshoeshaped Small Concert Hall, with its gallery supported by caryatids - pillars disguised as Greek maiden statues.
The placement of the inscriptions, which were incised and painted red for visibility, makes fairly certain that statues stood at intervals atop each columnar order, in a manner consistent with standard Roman plaza decoration such as with the caryatids from the Forum of Augustus or the Dacian captives in the Forum of Trajan.
According to the author, the use of Roman stola on Greek Caryatids is an example of Vitruvius using women publicly (emphasizing their role as virtuous, domestic, good women).
Working in the classical tradition, Van Doren's distinctive drawings are drawn from twenty years of his career and document him as an accomplished colorist with a particular affinity for architectural elements such as domes, corbels, caryatids, bays, oriels, cornices, medallions, entablatures, pediments, and other aspects of architectural distinction, shape and texture.
The base of the caryatids vessel, hyperboloid in shape, symbolizes the subterranean world.
By returning to oil-paint he liberated himself from chiselling out savage African deities and Grecian caryatids who could support nothing.
19) The image of Czechs, Poles, and other "Bedientenvolker" as load-bearing caryatids has an influential predecessor in an 1861 poem by Friedrich Hebbel, as is discussed by Hausler (I am grateful to an anonymous referee for bringing this essay to my attention).