cascade


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

cascade

1. a waterfall or series of waterfalls over rocks
2. 
a. a consecutive sequence of chemical or physical processes
b. (as modifier): cascade liquefaction
3. 
a. a series of stages in the processing chain of an electrical signal where each operates the next in turn
b. (as modifier): a cascade amplifier
4. the cumulative process responsible for the formation of an electrical discharge, cosmic-ray shower, or Geiger counter avalanche in a gas
5. the sequence of spontaneous decays by an excited atom or ion

cascade

See cosmic rays.

Cascade

An artificial waterfall that breaks the water as it flows over stone steps, usually found in a garden setting.

Cascade

 

in landscaping, a natural or artificial waterfall descending over terraced steps. In park architecture cascades are created by building at various levels of bodies of water and of steps and terraces over which the water descends. Examples of famous cascades are those in Italy, in the Villa d’Este in Tivoli (1550–72, architect P. Ligorio) and the Villa Aldobrandini in Frascati (1598–1604, architects G. della Porta and C. Maderna), as well as those in the park in Petrodvorets.

In the figurative sense a cascade is a rapid irrepressible flowof something—for example, words or sounds.

cascade

[ka′skād]
(computer science)
A series of actions that take place in the course of data processing, each triggered by the previous action in the series.
(electricity)
An electric-power circuit arrangement in which circuit breakers of reduced interrupting ratings are used in the branches, the circuit breakers being assisted in their protection function by other circuit breakers which operate almost instantaneously. Also known as backup arrangement.
(electronics)
(engineering)
An arrangement of separation devices, such as isotope separators, connected in series so that they multiply the effect of each individual device.
(geology)
A landform structure formed by gravity collapse, consisting of a bed that buckles into a series of folds as it slides down the flanks of an anticline.
(hydrology)
A small waterfall or series of falls descending over rocks.
(cell and molecular biology)
A molecular system that is capable of self-propagation or amplification.
(physics)
The emission of a series of photons by a quantum system, such as an atomic nucleus or a laser, in an excited state, accompanying transitions of the system to successively lower excited states, until the system reaches the ground state.

cascade

(compiler)
A huge volume of spurious error-messages output by a compiler with poor error recovery. Too frequently, one trivial syntax error (such as a missing ")" or "}") throws the parser out of synch so that much of the remaining program text, whether correct or not, is interpreted as garbaged or ill-formed.

cascade

(messaging)
A chain of Usenet followups, each adding some trivial variation or riposte to the text of the previous one, all of which is reproduced in the new message; an include war in which the object is to create a sort of communal graffito.

cascade

(networking)
A collection of interconneced networking devices, typically hubs, that allows those devices to act together as a logical repeater.

cascade

A connected series of devices or images. It often implies that the second and subsequent device takes over after the previous one is used up. For example, cascading tapes in a dual-tape backup system means the second tape is written after the first one is full. In a PC, a second IRQ chip is cascaded to the first, doubling the number of interrupts.
References in classic literature ?
Bert found it quite possible to look down and contemplate the wild sub-arctic landscape below, now devoid of any sign of habitation, a land of rocky cliffs and cascades and broad swirling desolate rivers, and of trees and thickets that grew more stunted and scrubby as the day wore on.
They had the appearance of old sea cliffs; here and there were small clumps of conifers, and in two places tall cascades.
From these cases and from these barrels escaped ingots of gold and silver, cascades of piastres and jewels.
Some came rushing down gullies and ravines; others tumbled in crystal cascades from inaccessible clefts and rocks, and others winding their way in rapid and pellucid currents across the valley, to throw themselves into the main river.
Manicamp began to scoop up his gold by handfuls, and pour it in cascades upon his bed.
Of course we drove in the Bois de Boulogne, that limitless park, with its forests, its lakes, its cascades, and its broad avenues.
which were regarded as wonderful in 1653, are still so, even at the present time; the cascades awakened the admiration of kings and princes; and as for the famous grotto, the theme of so many poetical effusions, the residence of that illustrious nymph of Vaux, whom Pelisson made converse with La Fontaine, we must be spared the description of all its beauties.
The cascades, somewhat rebellious nymphs though they were, poured forth their waters brighter and clearer than crystal: they scattered over the bronze triton and nereids their waves of foam, which glistened like fire in the rays of the sun.
He went up a great many flights of stairs, and he noticed, as he had very seldom noticed, how the carpet became steadily shabbier, until it ceased altogether, how the walls were discolored, sometimes by cascades of damp, and sometimes by the outlines of picture-frames since removed, how the paper flapped loose at the corners, and a great flake of plaster had fallen from the ceiling.
The pyramid of shimmering glasses, that had never been disturbed, changed to cascades as heavy bottles were flung into them.
Far below, the river frothed and flowed over pebbly shallows, or broke tumultuously over boulders and cascades, in its race for the great valley they had left behind.
The curing salt carded out with the rubber profiles is concentrated in the rinsing cascade, solid particles are filtered out, and the reaction foam (i.