Cast

(redirected from cast around)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms.

cast

1. 
a. a throw at dice
b. the resulting number shown
2. Angling
a. a trace with a fly or flies attached
b. the act or an instance of casting
3. 
a. the actors in a play collectively
b. (as modifier): a cast list
4. 
a. an object made of metal, glass, etc., that has been shaped in a molten state by being poured or pressed into a mould
b. the mould used to shape such an object
5. a fixed twist or defect, esp in the eye
6. Surgery a rigid encircling casing, often made of plaster of Paris, for immobilizing broken bones while they heal
7. Pathol a mass of fatty, waxy, cellular, or other material formed in a diseased body cavity, passage, etc.
8. the act of casting a pack of hounds
9. Falconry a pair of falcons working in combination to pursue the same quarry
10. Archery the speed imparted to an arrow by a particular bow
11. a computation or calculation
12. Palaeontol a replica of an organic object made of nonorganic material, esp a lump of sediment that indicates the internal or external surface of a shell or skeleton
13. Palaeontol a sedimentary structure representing the infilling of a mark or depression in a soft layer of sediment (or bed)

Cast

 

an exact reproduction in plaster of paris, wax, or papiermâché of some object. It is usually painted and serves primarily as a visual aid. For example, there are casts of fruits and fish, as well as of normal or pathologically altered organs or parts of the body. Casts are either taken from the object itself or executed by hand according to measurements.

Examples of casts include death masks, reproductions of the hand of a famous musician, and copies of a classical work of sculpture for teaching purposes (hence the phrase, cast studios).


Cast

 

in paleontology, an imprint that remains in sedimentary rock after the dissolution and decomposition of plants or the bodies or skeletons of animals. Casts have been found of mollusk shells, fish skeletons, jellyfish, leaves, stems, and seeds. Impressions of a whole body, especially of a skeletonless animal, are rarely preserved. (SeeFOSSIL REMAINS OF ORGANISMS.)


Cast

 

in art, a reproduction of a sculpture, an object of applied art, or some other art object obtained by taking a hard or soft mold of the original and casting a duplicate in plaster of paris, a synthetic material, or some other material. Hard molds may be made from plaster of paris, and soft molds from wax or plastic. Casts are used in museum exhibits, in restoration work, and as an aid in teaching art.


Cast

 

in paleontology, a type of fossilization of plants and animals in which the actual organic remains, for example, a shell or stem, have disappeared through oxidation or leaching, and the resulting cavity has become filled with sediment. Frequently, the imprint of fine external details may be seen on the surface of a cast. Some parts of the organism may be preserved inside a cast.

The term “cast” is also used to designate an artificial reproduction of a fossil from gypsum or synthetic materials.

cast

[kast]
(engineering)
To form a liquid or plastic substance into a fixed shape by letting it cool in the mold.
Any object which is formed by placing a castable substance in a mold or form and allowing it to solidify. Also known as casting.
(medicine)
A rigid dressing used to immobilize a part of the body.
(navigation)
To turn a ship in its own water.
To turn a ship to a desired direction without gaining either headway or sternway.
To take a sounding with the lead.
(optics)
A change in a color because of the adding of a different hue.
(paleontology)
A fossil reproduction of a natural object formed by infiltration of a mold of the object by waterborne minerals.
(physiology)
A mass of fibrous material or exudate having the form of the body cavity in which it has been molded; classified from its source, such as bronchial, renal, or tracheal.

cast, staff

In plastering, a shape, usually decorative, made in a mold and then fastened in place.

CAST

(1)
Computer Aided Software Testing

cast

(2)
References in periodicals archive ?
Fritz The Floating Fish Fry is blitzing rainbow trout in Lancashire's Pennine Fishery at Littleborough, near Rochdale, where floodlights tempt punters to cast around the clock.
As soon as he gained the power to build, he cast around for a suitable architect, lighting in Munich upon the unlikely figure of Paul Troost, who was neither young nor notably successful, and who died before his first large projects for Hitler were complete.
The Transparency of Evil reads our mass-media Sensurround of sameness and oneness between the lines of defense cast around the AIDS crisis.
The researchers built their synthetic antibodies out of polymers, using a technique called molecular imprinting to construct a cast around a target molecule.
After a part is cast around a ceramic core, the core is leached out of the part, leaving behind a complex pattern that provides cooling passages.
Cast around for the person who'll inspire my kids in anything like the same way and I can't see a likely candidate.
And with a talented cast around him, he got to work up close with Sutherland, who played Jack Bauer in 24.
With an excellent cast around him: ex-RSC Peter Peverley, David Tarkenter and Christina Berriman Dawson, who plays numerous minor female roles, the action takes place back stage at a rubbish pantomime.
The show really caught the imagination of the community - with more than 200 local people involved playing soldiers, children, pea-pickers, boatmen and women - and everyone following the cast around Stratford.
Taylor, who first picked up a guitar at the age of nine, was a member of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers when, in 1969, the Stones cast around looking for a replacement for Brian Jones.
George W Bush cast around for a new hate focus when the Twin Towers and the Pentagon were attacked in 2001, and found Al Qaeda.
She came top of the list when the Friends cast around for the best man - or in this case woman - for the job