Cast

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cast

1. 
a. a throw at dice
b. the resulting number shown
2. Angling
a. a trace with a fly or flies attached
b. the act or an instance of casting
3. 
a. the actors in a play collectively
b. (as modifier): a cast list
4. 
a. an object made of metal, glass, etc., that has been shaped in a molten state by being poured or pressed into a mould
b. the mould used to shape such an object
5. a fixed twist or defect, esp in the eye
6. Surgery a rigid encircling casing, often made of plaster of Paris, for immobilizing broken bones while they heal
7. Pathol a mass of fatty, waxy, cellular, or other material formed in a diseased body cavity, passage, etc.
8. the act of casting a pack of hounds
9. Falconry a pair of falcons working in combination to pursue the same quarry
10. Archery the speed imparted to an arrow by a particular bow
11. a computation or calculation
12. Palaeontol a replica of an organic object made of nonorganic material, esp a lump of sediment that indicates the internal or external surface of a shell or skeleton
13. Palaeontol a sedimentary structure representing the infilling of a mark or depression in a soft layer of sediment (or bed)

Cast

 

an exact reproduction in plaster of paris, wax, or papiermâché of some object. It is usually painted and serves primarily as a visual aid. For example, there are casts of fruits and fish, as well as of normal or pathologically altered organs or parts of the body. Casts are either taken from the object itself or executed by hand according to measurements.

Examples of casts include death masks, reproductions of the hand of a famous musician, and copies of a classical work of sculpture for teaching purposes (hence the phrase, cast studios).


Cast

 

in paleontology, an imprint that remains in sedimentary rock after the dissolution and decomposition of plants or the bodies or skeletons of animals. Casts have been found of mollusk shells, fish skeletons, jellyfish, leaves, stems, and seeds. Impressions of a whole body, especially of a skeletonless animal, are rarely preserved. (SeeFOSSIL REMAINS OF ORGANISMS.)


Cast

 

in art, a reproduction of a sculpture, an object of applied art, or some other art object obtained by taking a hard or soft mold of the original and casting a duplicate in plaster of paris, a synthetic material, or some other material. Hard molds may be made from plaster of paris, and soft molds from wax or plastic. Casts are used in museum exhibits, in restoration work, and as an aid in teaching art.


Cast

 

in paleontology, a type of fossilization of plants and animals in which the actual organic remains, for example, a shell or stem, have disappeared through oxidation or leaching, and the resulting cavity has become filled with sediment. Frequently, the imprint of fine external details may be seen on the surface of a cast. Some parts of the organism may be preserved inside a cast.

The term “cast” is also used to designate an artificial reproduction of a fossil from gypsum or synthetic materials.

cast

[kast]
(engineering)
To form a liquid or plastic substance into a fixed shape by letting it cool in the mold.
Any object which is formed by placing a castable substance in a mold or form and allowing it to solidify. Also known as casting.
(medicine)
A rigid dressing used to immobilize a part of the body.
(navigation)
To turn a ship in its own water.
To turn a ship to a desired direction without gaining either headway or sternway.
To take a sounding with the lead.
(optics)
A change in a color because of the adding of a different hue.
(paleontology)
A fossil reproduction of a natural object formed by infiltration of a mold of the object by waterborne minerals.
(physiology)
A mass of fibrous material or exudate having the form of the body cavity in which it has been molded; classified from its source, such as bronchial, renal, or tracheal.

cast, staff

In plastering, a shape, usually decorative, made in a mold and then fastened in place.

CAST

(1)
Computer Aided Software Testing

cast

(2)
References in periodicals archive ?
In it, the author describes and illustrates methods of adjusting for drop at heel, cast off, toe in, and pitch without sectioning the wood.
I thought you rebroke what you just got your cast off for.
Suddenly the women are emboldened to cast off their burqas and join the ranks of youthful democratic activists.
on February 16, the USNS Fisher cast off her lines from the Port of Beaumont, Texas and headed down the Neches River toward the Gulf of Mexico, loaded with 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment equipment bound for Southwest Asia.
But, being Humanists, we have cast off theism, haven't we?
The financial health of consumers is important to the economy, which in the second half of last year finally cast off its lethargy and began growing at a healthy pace.
While one can offer arguments to support the contention that the studenchestvo as an autonomous group disappeared under Soviet power and that many of the characteristics traditionally associated with the "student movement" had vanished by the late 1920's, the evidence in the student press shows that students refused to cast off their self-designated roles of political critics, social commentators, peer adjudicators and unconventional dilettantes.
Important features incude the Italian-made, self-compensating gas system for reliable duty and easy maintenance, a matched 22-inch rifled barrel with cantilever base, polished walnut Monte Carlo stock and Weatherby's special shim system to adjust cast off and sling swivel studs.
Grace is a culprit, as it was in Woburn, Massachusetts, pretending asbestos fibers can be easily cast off by the human body, withholding vital information from the community, and spreading lethal asbestos byproducts throughout the town.
Three months after that, the Ninnis Glacier Tongue, a 1,450 sq-km slab of ice jutting into the sea, snapped off near the shoreline and cast off for warmer climes.
It was a must-see place in a London finally beginning to de-provincialize and cast off some of its postwar austerity.
But in order to cast off the blinders that hamstrung humanity throughout the Dark Ages, great men like Galileo, Gutenberg, and Magellan not only had to throw off the weight of the Past, but had to teach future generations to also throw off the weight of the Past, even though the Past now included great men like them.