Cast

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cast

1. 
a. a throw at dice
b. the resulting number shown
2. Angling
a. a trace with a fly or flies attached
b. the act or an instance of casting
3. 
a. the actors in a play collectively
b. (as modifier): a cast list
4. 
a. an object made of metal, glass, etc., that has been shaped in a molten state by being poured or pressed into a mould
b. the mould used to shape such an object
5. a fixed twist or defect, esp in the eye
6. Surgery a rigid encircling casing, often made of plaster of Paris, for immobilizing broken bones while they heal
7. Pathol a mass of fatty, waxy, cellular, or other material formed in a diseased body cavity, passage, etc.
8. the act of casting a pack of hounds
9. Falconry a pair of falcons working in combination to pursue the same quarry
10. Archery the speed imparted to an arrow by a particular bow
11. a computation or calculation
12. Palaeontol a replica of an organic object made of nonorganic material, esp a lump of sediment that indicates the internal or external surface of a shell or skeleton
13. Palaeontol a sedimentary structure representing the infilling of a mark or depression in a soft layer of sediment (or bed)

Cast

 

an exact reproduction in plaster of paris, wax, or papiermâché of some object. It is usually painted and serves primarily as a visual aid. For example, there are casts of fruits and fish, as well as of normal or pathologically altered organs or parts of the body. Casts are either taken from the object itself or executed by hand according to measurements.

Examples of casts include death masks, reproductions of the hand of a famous musician, and copies of a classical work of sculpture for teaching purposes (hence the phrase, cast studios).


Cast

 

in paleontology, an imprint that remains in sedimentary rock after the dissolution and decomposition of plants or the bodies or skeletons of animals. Casts have been found of mollusk shells, fish skeletons, jellyfish, leaves, stems, and seeds. Impressions of a whole body, especially of a skeletonless animal, are rarely preserved. (SeeFOSSIL REMAINS OF ORGANISMS.)


Cast

 

in art, a reproduction of a sculpture, an object of applied art, or some other art object obtained by taking a hard or soft mold of the original and casting a duplicate in plaster of paris, a synthetic material, or some other material. Hard molds may be made from plaster of paris, and soft molds from wax or plastic. Casts are used in museum exhibits, in restoration work, and as an aid in teaching art.


Cast

 

in paleontology, a type of fossilization of plants and animals in which the actual organic remains, for example, a shell or stem, have disappeared through oxidation or leaching, and the resulting cavity has become filled with sediment. Frequently, the imprint of fine external details may be seen on the surface of a cast. Some parts of the organism may be preserved inside a cast.

The term “cast” is also used to designate an artificial reproduction of a fossil from gypsum or synthetic materials.

cast

[kast]
(engineering)
To form a liquid or plastic substance into a fixed shape by letting it cool in the mold.
Any object which is formed by placing a castable substance in a mold or form and allowing it to solidify. Also known as casting.
(medicine)
A rigid dressing used to immobilize a part of the body.
(navigation)
To turn a ship in its own water.
To turn a ship to a desired direction without gaining either headway or sternway.
To take a sounding with the lead.
(optics)
A change in a color because of the adding of a different hue.
(paleontology)
A fossil reproduction of a natural object formed by infiltration of a mold of the object by waterborne minerals.
(physiology)
A mass of fibrous material or exudate having the form of the body cavity in which it has been molded; classified from its source, such as bronchial, renal, or tracheal.

cast, staff

In plastering, a shape, usually decorative, made in a mold and then fastened in place.

CAST

(1)
Computer Aided Software Testing

cast

(2)
References in periodicals archive ?
Soon, congressmen began hearing complaints about Head Start from local politicians who had originally thought it would be okay to offer poor kids hot meals and cast-off books, only to discover that Head Start was creating a power base independent of their patronage.
Sew the cast-on and cast-off edges together leaving a 5cm gap for your thumb.
The generative contrasts in Graeve's work--between image and noise, handmade and manufactured, new and cast-off, utopian promise and material discard--already proved evident in the clutter of abstract painting and stereo equipment he installed at Grey Area Art Space Inc.
Among the most expensive cast-off items were a pounds 290 "Arthur Daley" style coat and a pounds 300 pair of Prada trousers.
In order to guarantee optimal support of these applications SUSS MicroTec has designed its coating equipment to accommodate a wide range of photoresist viscosities, while a unique coat bowl design prevents the typical build-up of cast-off resist.
Arsenal cast-off Gervinho, who will lead the Roma attack, said: "When I wake up, I can't wait to go to training.
Micky Hammond has a good level-stakes profit at this track and he can orchestrate a decent run from this wellbred Coolmore cast-off, his sole runner on the card.
As a growing number of specialty pharma companies compete for a dwindling number of big pharma's underpromoted, cast-off products, specialty pharma must make use of product opportunities beyond the traditional growth-by-acquisition model.
SHAUN Murphy won the world crown with a cast-off cue from Ray Reardon.
When the Sox's David Ortiz smacked the winning hit, an excited Maria Shriver jumped off the sofa of her California home ( landing on one of her children's cast-off shoes and breaking her foot.
Burtynsky's photos of piled cast-off tires in California give a mild sense of vertigo as the heaped objects appear to teeter high above the viewer.
As a growing number of specialty pharma companies compete for a dwindling number of big pharma's under promoted, cast-off products, specialty pharma must make use of product opportunities beyond the traditional growth-by-acquisition model.