castanets


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castanets

(kăs'tənĕts`), percussion instruments known to the ancient Egyptians and Greeks, possibly of Middle Eastern origin, now used primarily in Spanish dance music or imitations of it. There are many kinds, the most common consisting of two small matching pieces of hard wood or ivory, joined at the inner edge and used with a thin strap in the player's hand; they are snapped together between the palm and fingers. Castanets are also occasionally used in orchestral music.
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51 pages in length, Tambourines, Bone Castanets, and Banjos Meet Jump Jim Crow: A History of Blackfaced Minstrelsy in America From 1828 to 1898: A Forgotten Heirloom In American Entertainment is being aggressively promoted to appropriate markets with a focus on the theater and performing arts history and criticism category.
The Habibis crack out the castanets and chants for some traditional Greek music, while film score composer Ollie Olsen takes the music in a darker, more ominous direction.
Then put your thumb and finger into the glove pieces, and click together the castanets.
His images, which range from a medieval siege to a long-eared bat, from rodents to castanets, seem to bear no direct relation to Mathews' text, and this may be the point.
Marina Keet discovered Spanish dance as a ballet student in London, where she heard a pair of castanets, followed the sound, and opened the door of Elsa Brunelleschi's studio.
CALABASAS - With castanets, muskets and guitars, the Calabasas Anza Heritage Association on Sunday re-created the story of a 1776 Spanish expedition in a performance at the Sepulveda Adobe.
Los Danzaq de Ayacucho performed Peru's centuries-old scissors dance, named for the steel castanets that accompany the intricate footwork and acrobatics.
She sang her aunt Carmen Miranda's ``Tico Tico,'' with castanets and a lot of hip movement.
For The Nightingale and the Maiden, with music by Enrique Granados, the program read: "The Maja, her gay frivolity gone, is portrayed in somber hues of sorrow, and finds through her castanets an affinity with the nightingale.
Miranda Miranda, like her aunt, wears heavy makeup and moves with that same flare for rhythm, sometimes using castanets to enhance her delivery.
To the soulful music of Enrique Granados, she waltzed around the stage, playing castanets so that their sounds accented the articulation of her expressive arms and upper body.
Even more devoid of style--and stylishness--were the character variations, especially the plodding Hungarian czardas for the Russians and the polka accompanied by castanets for the Spaniards.