castration anxiety


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Related to castration anxiety: castration complex, Electra complex

castration anxiety

[ka′strā·shən aŋ′zī·ə·dē]
(psychology)
Anxiety due to the fear of loss of the genitals or injury to them.
References in periodicals archive ?
I could never quite believe that Sigmund F's assertion that all men suffered from castration anxiety could be taken seriously by so many writers.
Another behavior associated with castration anxiety is homosexuality (Goldenson 1: 187), references to which abound in the story.
I want to be fair and acknowledge Eby's one-sentence disclaimer that "while analysts no longer look for the origins of fetishism in castration anxiety "an unusually sharp castration complex is [still] generally agreed to be the central organizing nucleus in the structure of fetishism" (55, Eby's italics, quoting Roiphe and Galenson).
As Freud was adumbrating the structural theory, he was constantly running into the vexing dilemma of female castration anxiety.
Among some of the major concepts discussed in this paper were: castration anxiety, fear of loss of love, the death instinct, and the role of the defense mechanisms (especially denial).
Many are toys, suggesting what Freud called male infantile curiosity about the female body, and, with that, castration anxiety.
Further, she deconstructs this look positing it between a reinforcement of the patriarchal, symbolic order and a fetishization of the female actor in response to castration anxiety.
Boyarin offers an all-embracing explanation for Freud's controversial switch from the seduction theory to the theory of instinctual infantile sexuality as well as his development of the "phallic" ideas of oedipal conflict, castration anxiety, and penis envy.
According to classic psychoanalytic studies by Phyllis Greenacre, boys frequently cope with fragile body-images and the resultant intensification of castration anxiety by adopting a fetish - an object, which as Freud observed, can paradoxically both stand in for and confirm the absence of the maternal or female phallus, the absence of which seems to confirm the possibility of masculine castration.
What is significant for the formation of the anxiety hysteria is not simply that its ground is established within the oedipus complex, nor that it expresses a unique relation to castration anxiety, but rather, in addition to these issues concerning more the content of the anxiety, the anxiety representations in fantasy (Hans' phobia) work only by dint of a privileged, though not specified, relationship between the horse complex and anxiety.
More than haunts: castration anxiety has become the centerpiece of a way of looking and thinking about classic cinema that has dominated academic film discussion for almost twenty years.
After all, truck-stop glamour + rotating blade = castration anxiety spectacle par excellence.