casuistry

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casuistry

(kăzh`yo͞oĭstrē) [Lat., casus=case], art of applying general moral law to particular cases. Although most often associated with theology (it has been utilized since the inception of Christianity), it is also used in law and psychology. The function of casuistry is to analyze motives so individual judgments can be made in accordance with an established moral code. The term is often used in a pejorative sense to indicate specious or equivocal reasoning.

casuistry

Philosophy the resolution of particular moral dilemmas, esp those arising from conflicting general moral rules, by careful distinction of the cases to which these rules apply
References in periodicals archive ?
88) This practice, and its differentiation between honestos and utilitos widely regarded as classic reason of state, is, in fact, essentially casuist in that the recourse to distrust and dissimulation 'departs from virtue or the laws in the interest of the King and Kingdom'.
Protestant casuists called their art by a different name ("case divinity" or "cases of conscience"), but remained heavily indebted to the Catholic casuists.
These models of prudent discrimination demonstrate the ethical difficulties that casuists confront.
63) Camille Slights has observed that, while "Roman Catholic casuistry was designed to guide the clergy in the confessional," "Protestantism assumes that ultimately everyone is his own casuist and must think through every moral doubt for himself.
The life of a Casuist is an intellectual one, with priests such as Beaulieu continually arguing various sides of issues, including the key one: Is God an actuality or another of man's fictions?
In her second section, Brown applys casuist aims and methods to the Paradoxes, Bianthanatos, Pseudo-Martyr, the sermon on Esther and Essays in Divinity.
A casuist, he serves as an intellectual foil to Stephen Dedalus.
Hollowell's thesis is that the secondary literature on Ramsey has wrongly considered him to be a casuist focused on controversial issues, something that has led many of his contributions to be ignored.
Fionnaula Dillane's Before George Eliot examines Marian Evans' relationship with the periodical press and the personae she constructed, including the '"character of editress' (Evans' own ironic description); the ambiguously gendered reviewer; the casuist and companion of her clerical scenes who is at once obvious and opaque"; and finally the "pompous city bachelor Theophrastus Such" (6).
elevation, Stephen conceals with casuist ability, under
Not noted here is that Masson in this same book pointed George Eliot, who was well acquainted with him through Lewes, in the direction she moved in after Adam Bede (the need for "imaginary histories illustrating the deeper problems of human education," and "a sound casuist in the most difficult questions of human experience").
Viewed from the perspective of a casuist, what would you, as therapists, in the Tarasoff case do, and how would you justify your actions?