casuistry

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casuistry

(kăzh`yo͞oĭstrē) [Lat., casus=case], art of applying general moral law to particular cases. Although most often associated with theology (it has been utilized since the inception of Christianity), it is also used in law and psychology. The function of casuistry is to analyze motives so individual judgments can be made in accordance with an established moral code. The term is often used in a pejorative sense to indicate specious or equivocal reasoning.

casuistry

Philosophy the resolution of particular moral dilemmas, esp those arising from conflicting general moral rules, by careful distinction of the cases to which these rules apply
References in periodicals archive ?
This definition is in fact upheld by the evidence of Spanish casuistical manuals such as Antonio de Cordoba's Tratado de casos de consciencia (1573), in which specific cases of conscience are analyzed for the purpose of telling the reader, in practical terms, what to do.
Compare Charles Fried's casual treatment of a classic nonlegal dilemma, that "[o]ne who provides an expensive education for his own children surely cannot be blamed because he does not use these resources to alleviate famine or to save lives in some distant land," (122) with the full casuistical analysis of the same problem conducted by ethicist Garth Hallett in his book Priorities and Christian Ethics.
Moreover, they owe little to moral theorizing generally, whether the abstract variety exemplified by Kant, Sidgwick, or Rawls, or the casuistical variety exemplified by Judith Thomson.
Cookson proposes that a casuistical free exercise jurisprudence can offer a fair and more just alternative process for resolving the conflict of principles which underlie most free exercise cases.
The key, I think, is to place him in the context of the casuistical tradition in which he writes.
But, as he says, there are parallels; indeed, he speaks of "[t]he place of casuistical analysis in Tudor legal discourse" as being "well established".
7) I discuss conscience in Richard III in more detail and from a different perspective in The Casuistical Tradition in Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, and Milton (Princeton U.
All summer, serious newspapers have felt it necessary to publish casuistical Op-Eds by apologists for "creation science"--and the Old Testament is the only biology textbook you really need, these clever fellows forgot to add.
All summer, serious newspapers have felt it necessary to publish casuistical Op-Eds by apologists for "creation science"-and the Old Testament is the only biology textbook you really need, these clever fellows forgot to add.
Initially, there were no satisfactory mechanisms for linking statements of principle, such as the AFL's often stated opposition to racism in any form, on or off the field, to casuistical capacity.
It is tempting to think that the Supreme Court has erred in maintaining its casuistical, rule-free, fact-specific course in the context of affirmative action.
Correspondingly, the "thin" and formalistic universal law formulation of Kant's categorical imperative is tied necessarily to the "thick" and substantive end-in-itself formulation, now reconceived as the basic a priori moral principle for a quasi-deductive casuistical (in the good sense) system of moral judgments.