casuistry


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casuistry

(kăzh`yo͞oĭstrē) [Lat., casus=case], art of applying general moral law to particular cases. Although most often associated with theology (it has been utilized since the inception of Christianity), it is also used in law and psychology. The function of casuistry is to analyze motives so individual judgments can be made in accordance with an established moral code. The term is often used in a pejorative sense to indicate specious or equivocal reasoning.

casuistry

Philosophy the resolution of particular moral dilemmas, esp those arising from conflicting general moral rules, by careful distinction of the cases to which these rules apply
References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas on which they draw to support their own view are in fact fully compatible with the New Natural Law account; and that neither the New Natural Law account of the controversial Phoenix abortion case, nor its account of the casuistry surrounding the acceptance of side-effects, is deficient in the ways asserted by Koons and O'Brien.
Sebelius has stopped denying that fact, but even yesterday addressed it with a mix of casuistry and half-truths.
Rippin [Aldershot, 2001]), summarizes al-Suyuti's accomplishment: "The appearance of being exhaustive, the care for detail, the casuistry, and the taxonomy give the feeling of a confident erudition that is complete, convenient of access, and couched in contemporary usage" (trans.
Yet to argue that Salle was focused on an art of existential effect (as if following a thread leading from Suprematism through Abstract Expressionism) smacks terribly of casuistry, since, from the outset of his notable career, the ocean of ciphers in which he has luxuriated have begged to be decoded.
Altman grounds this diachronic reading in plays that are not usually considered romances but that, in his reasoning, share an inchoate movement toward revelation, transcendence, and the Protestant casuistry of imputed righteousness and away from the ways that probability limits action.
Such use of euphemism leads to casuistry and, ultimately, the losing of an argument.
The long history of casuistry that has been part of Western thinking ever since people began writing laws (or believing that God had given them laws to follow) manifests in modern discussions as hypothetical cases or Gedankenexperiment carefully designed to test where exactly the pale lies between success and failure in adherence to the law.
Moralism, an inordinate, legalistic dependence upon absolute moral codes out of fear of divine judgment, leads to elaborate, complicated casuistry.
As Maryks further acknowledges, it is his purpose in this book tenaciously to highlight "the crucial links between early-modern casuistry and ancient rhetoric (especially Ciceronian)" and to underline the fact that the Jesuits came to base "their rhetoric and casuistry on the Ciceronian .
Ali bin Fadhl bin Ghanem Al Buainain, Chairman of the Sunni Supreme Sharia Court Shaikh Adnan bin Abdullah Al Qattan, Deputy Sheit Supreme Court Shaikh Nasser Ahmed Khalaf Al Asfoor, Judge at the Supreme Court of Civil Appeal Shaikh Mohammed bin Ali Bin Mohammed Al Khalifa, Judge at the Supreme Court of Civil Appeal Isa bin Mubarak Al Ka'abi, Chairman of Legislation and legal casuistry Committee Abdulla bin Hassan Al Buainain, Judge at the Supreme Court of Civil Appeal Saed Hassan Jassim Al Hayki and Lawyer Hameed Habeeb Ahmed.
To this day, within me, there are traits of cultural Judaism that have not been washed away in the deluge of shame I experience when confronted by the actions of the state of Israel and the casuistry of her apologists.
Two of them recalled that Toulmin was my coauthor on The Abuse of Casuistry.