catalepsy


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Related to catalepsy: narcolepsy

catalepsy

(kăt`əlĕp'sē), pathological condition characterized by a loss of consciousness accompanied by rigidity of muscles that keeps limbs in any position in which they are placed. Attacks vary from several minutes to days and occur in a variety of clinical syndromes, most frequently in schizophrenia, epilepsy, and hysteria.

Catalepsy

 

the phenomenon of “waxy rigidity,” observed incatatonia or hypnotic sleep (hypnosis). With an increase in mus-cle tonus, there is an onset of rigidity (flexible rigidity), so thateither the entire body or the extremities remain in any positionin which they are placed.

catalepsy

[′kad·əl‚ep·sē]
(psychology)
Suspended animation with loss of voluntary motion associated with hysteria and the schizophrenic reactions in humans, and with organic nervous system disease in animals.

catalepsy

a state of prolonged rigid posture, occurring for example in schizophrenia or in hypnotic trances
References in periodicals archive ?
Trance, coma, syncope, catalepsy, insensibility, suspended animation, human hibernation, and anesthesia were only the most common labels for what appeared to be corporal frontiers" (Behlmer, p.
When very frightened, a rabbit lays its ears flat, partially or fully closes its eyes, and enters a state called catalepsy or trancing.
Amidst the rigors of the Ancient East a self-induced catalepsy may have proved strategic from time to time, but with reference to the scientific culture ours attempts to be, I frankly fear that Dylan Thomas was right about "all the deadly virtues.
1) motoric immobility as evidenced by catalepsy (including waxy flexibility) or stupor
Foucault cites the 1777 French translation Traite des maladies nerveuses by Robert Whytt, with regard to madness and the satisfaction of passions: "It is not unheard of that the passions, being very violent, generate a kind of tetanus or catalepsy such that the person then resembles a stature more than a living being.
Clozapine was "atypical" in that it did not cause profound catalepsy in rats (the animal model of neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism in humans), and seemed to manifest a broader spectrum of biochemical actions.
And in catalepsy and a dead trance, I studiously held the quick of my nature.
With a final rush he halted near the officer in front of him, and with his eyes staring and glassy, he tilted forward as though to fall into catalepsy against the officer's crooked little mustache, bursting out with his last breath:
16) She was a gripping orator whose charisma held the masses spellbound; her critics claimed she practiced hypnotism, mesmerism, or catalepsy, and attributed her cures to these devices.
Meanwhile, whereas the noun "ecstasy" could, in Shakespeare's day, have a fairly clinical meaning (suggesting "all morbid states characterized by unconsciousness, as swoon, trance, catalepsy, etc.
Prediction of Drug-Induced Catalepsy Based on Dopamine D1, D2, and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Occupancies.
She suffers from narcolepsy and catalepsy, which means that if she gets a fright she can slip into a coma.