catalepsy

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catalepsy

(kăt`əlĕp'sē), pathological condition characterized by a loss of consciousness accompanied by rigidity of muscles that keeps limbs in any position in which they are placed. Attacks vary from several minutes to days and occur in a variety of clinical syndromes, most frequently in schizophrenia, epilepsy, and hysteria.

Catalepsy

 

the phenomenon of “waxy rigidity,” observed incatatonia or hypnotic sleep (hypnosis). With an increase in mus-cle tonus, there is an onset of rigidity (flexible rigidity), so thateither the entire body or the extremities remain in any positionin which they are placed.

catalepsy

[′kad·əl‚ep·sē]
(psychology)
Suspended animation with loss of voluntary motion associated with hysteria and the schizophrenic reactions in humans, and with organic nervous system disease in animals.

catalepsy

a state of prolonged rigid posture, occurring for example in schizophrenia or in hypnotic trances
References in periodicals archive ?
This is also featured in his novel "The premature burial", in which he writes about prolonged cataleptic seizures which might be the consequence of being buried alive rather than its cause.
In 10 cases, the female remained cataleptic after copulation.
The unusual cataleptic trances that Hopkins observed in Suffield were part of a broader phenomenon that frequently attended the powerful sermons preached by itinerating evangelists like Edwards, Wheelock, and Pomeroy.
Retraumatized by the loss of his golden hoard, Silas stands, half-crazy, in a cataleptic fit.
If the Chinese prove themselves capable of salvaging businesses as cataleptic as Amtrak and the NHL, then they will truly prove themselves to be economic adversaries to be feared.
These plants develop a subterranean cataleptic innovation zone, the green, upright stem zone and further upwards the flowering zone becomes closed by the terminal flower (Fig.
By use of the balancing conjunction but in the same passage, this death image of the cataleptic Taylor is weighed against the image of the athletic middle-aged gentleman who can "play six Hours at Cricket on Banstead-Down, without Fatigue or Lowness, and [is] more active and clear in his Faculties and Senses than ever he [has] been in his Life before" (336).
sufferer of a cataleptic swoon, the narrator describes, remains in a
It subsequently transpires, however, that she has been buried alive while in a cataleptic state (shades of Edgar Allan Poe
Gerbils who have undergone extreme stress, such as a change in environment, loud noises or unaccustomed handling, may go into fits or a cataleptic (dazed) state that lasts for one or two minutes.
She had been buried alive, deep in a cataleptic sleep, and therefore her death is not an acceptable one for a martyr.
To these three historia calamitata Poe adds the narrator's own fever dream of death--of being "immersed in a cataleptic trance of more than usual duration and profundity" (Stern 1977: 184).