catastrophe theory


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Related to catastrophe theory: Chaos theory

catastrophe theory

[kə′tas·trə·fē ‚thē·ə·rē]
(mathematics)
A theory of mathematical structure in which smooth continuous inputs lead to discontinuous responses.
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After the dimensionless state variables of each hierarchical level are processed, the total catastrophe progression value of the evaluation object is calculated and determined, according to the mathematical model of the corresponding catastrophe theory types and the principle of "complementarities" and "non-complementarities (Wen & Chen, 2016).
In this paper, the cusp catastrophe theory was utilized to determine the maximum flattened Brazilian disc coefficient.
Included within the sciences of complexity are chaos theory, catastrophe theory, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, Boolean networks and the NK model (N refers to the number of agents and K to the number of connections between them), networks science, and collective intelligence, among others.
Catastrophe theory was proposed in an attempt to rationally account for the phenomenon of discontinuous change in behaviors (outputs) resulting from continuous change in parameters (inputs) in a given system.
Mathematicians familiar with catastrophe theory will recognize that these two families of functions, the cubic curves and the quartic curves, are two of the most important basic examples in that theory.
According to the Toba catastrophe theory, a supervolcanic event 75,000 years ago at Lake Toba, on Sumatra, triggered an ice age that changed the course of human history by creating a bottleneck in evolution.
Catastrophe theory was originally developed by the French mathematician Rene Thorn (1975) to model geometrically all the naturally occurring discontinuities in the world.
Can catastrophe theory explain the properties of school reform as well as the dynamics of physical systems?
During the post 30 years, the author asserts, three theories relevant to the question have emerged: catastrophe theory, chaos theory, and complexity theory.
A disciple of Rene Thom and Levi-Strauss, he is a champion of Thom's morphodynamic modelling and Zeeman's catastrophe theory.
Examples are probability theory, game theory, information theory, chaos theory, queuing theory, catastrophe theory.
First, he develops four propositions from Prigogine's self-organization theory, and then extends Kauffman's complexity catastrophe theory to firms.