cathodic inhibitor

cathodic inhibitor

[kə′thäd·ik in′hib·əd·ər]
(chemical engineering)
A compound, such as calcium bicarbonate or sodium phosphate, which is deposited on a metal surface in a thin film that operates at the cathodes to provide physical protection over the entire surface against corrosive attack in a conducting medium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cathodic inhibitors, such as inorganic salts of magnesium and manganese, suppress corrosion at the cathode by forming insoluble deposits with hydroxyl ions in neutral environments.