Catholic

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Catholic

Christianity
1. denoting or relating to the entire body of Christians, esp to the Church before separation into the Greek or Eastern and Latin or Western Churches
2. denoting or relating to the Latin or Western Church after this separation
3. denoting or relating to the Roman Catholic Church
4. denoting or relating to any church, belief, etc., that claims continuity with or originates in the ancient undivided Church

Easter Monday

Between March 23 and April 26; Monday after Easter
Although Easter Sunday is the culmination of Holy Week and the end of Lent, the following Monday (also known as Pasch Monday ) is observed as a public holiday in many nations, perhaps to round off the long weekend that begins on Good Friday. In London there is a big Easter parade in Hyde Park on this day.
A curious English tradition associated at one time with Easter Monday involved "lifting" or "heaving." Forming what children call a "chair" by crossing hands and grasping another person's wrists, the men would lift the women on Easter Monday—sometimes carrying them for a short distance down the street or to the village green—and on Easter Tuesday the women would lift the men. A similar retaliatory game involved taking off each other's shoes. This is thought to have a connection with the resurrection of Christ. Polish children play smigus, a water-throwing game.
SOURCES:
AmerBkDays-2000, p. 242
BkFest-1937, pp. 16, 57, 261
DictDays-1988, pp. 8, 11, 35, 55, 56, 122
EncyEaster-2002, p. 122
FestSaintDays-1915, p. 91
OxYear-1999, p. 625

Celebrated in: Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Central African Republic, Chad, Cote d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, England and Wales, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Grenada, Guinea, Guyana, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Monaco, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Northern Ireland, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Republic of Georgia, Republic of Kosovo, Rwanda, Samoa, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, Ukraine, Vanuatu, Zambia, Zimbabwe


Easter Monday (Netherlands)
Between March 23 and April 26; Monday after Easter
Easter Monday, or Paasch Maandag, is celebrated in the Netherlands with games played with Easter eggs. Eierrapen, or hunting for eggs, is a favorite pastime among younger children. Eiertikken, or hitting hard-boiled eggs together, is a sport for children of all ages. In rural areas, the eggs are still dyed with coffee grounds, beet juice, onion skins, and other vegetable substances. Then they're packed in baskets and carried to an open field for the eiertikken contest. At a given signal, the children line up and try to break the shell of an opposing team member's egg (the two eggs must be the same color) by knocking them together. The winner keeps the opponent's egg, and the boy or girl who collects the most eggs wins.
Another Easter game, which was popular in the 16th and 17th centuries and was still played in the 20th, is called the eiergaren. Played by both children and adults who assemble in the main streets of villages on Easter Monday, the game involves a tub of water with a huge apple floating in it. The tub is placed in the middle of the road and 25 eggs are placed at intervals of about 12 feet along the same road. One person must eat the apple with his hands tied behind his back while a second contestant has to run and gather up all the eggs in a basket before the apple is eaten. Whoever finishes his or her task first is the victor.
SOURCES:
BkFest-1937, p. 242
EncyEaster-2002, p. 123
FestWestEur-1958, p. 131

Celebrated in: Netherlands

References in periodicals archive ?
Catholicity continued to germinate in Delio's subsequent book, The Unbearable Wholeness of Being (2013).
From 2006 to 2015, Notre Dame College Prep (NDCP) was led by an Association of Christian Faithful (ACF), a public juridic person which is a structure in canon law designed to function as religious orders once did in maintaining the Catholicity of an institution or ministry.
the divisions among Christians prevent the church from realizing in practice the fullness of catholicity proper to her, in those of her sons and daughters who, though attached to her by baptism, are yet separated from full communion with her.
One of the things I missed throughout the reading of Fragmented Catholicity and Social Cohesion: Faith Schools in a Plural Society, is at least a slight reference to the social and economic approaches of Catholic schools.
Methodological catholicity is based on the view that (1) different methods have different strengths and limitations, and (2) no unbridgeable, qualitative/quantitative chasm divides the discipline.
Significantly, she continues the struggle within the Roman Catholic Church, where, she insists, the world-church lacks the fullness of catholicity when half of its members are still excluded from full rights and responsibilities.
He said: "I now believe that Academy status could provide us with an opportunity to strengthen and develop further the Catholicity of our schools and the bonds of partnership currently in existence.
This way of approaching an understanding of Anglicanism enables a number of important issues to come out; how identity is conceived, the underlying principle of contextualisation, Catholicity and the provision of ministry and sacraments.
This volume will retain its reputation not just because of the catholicity of its coverage but because the writers not only explain but invite the reader to investigate for himself the works discussed here.
It convincingly proves its central thesis about heresy, while remaining relatively mute and unsatisfying about catholicity.
gwt "The Catholicity of the school was recognised and its importance in contributing to the life of the school.
It would seem that if mission derives from catholicity, and if catholicity is a note or mark of the church, then mission derives from and is thereby subordinate to church.