caudillismo


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Related to caudillismo: Juan Manuel de Rosas

caudillismo

a system of rule by one man using violence or the threat of violence for political ends (a Spanish word used in the 19th-century to refer to regional or national military rulers who emerged in Latin America after independence from Spain). The term is now more generally used to refer to localized, powerful individuals who may call upon followers, either within or outside a state system, to use violence or the threat of violence to coerce others. In Mexico cacique means the same, or is the preferred term, when applied to local, rather than regional or national, power brokers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caudillismo persists in Argentina, Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Cuba, and Nicaragua,
That said, Marcos's charismatic character, like those of Villa, Zapata, Che, Hugo Chavez, and Fidel Castro, begs some discussion of the historical culture of caudillismo, a love affair that continues in Latin America.
Jose Figueres and his National Liberation movement's liberal democratic social reform in Costa Rica from the 1950s through the 1970s allowed a democratic exchange of political perspectives, and in Venezuela, the presidential election of the Accion Democratica/Democratic Action Party's Romulo Betancourt in 1958 initiated constitutional rule that had been disallowed by a long-standing tradition of military-protected caudillismo.
Although Harvey acknowledges the critical contribution of religious leaders, he also considers the "charges of caudillismo [that] were leveled against these new community leaders" (p.
Mayor Saez spoke of the age-old confrontation between the old ideas of "statism and caudillismo which is sometimes dressed as a military, sometimes as a civil -- and the modern democratic ideal that development consists of creation and reinforcement of solid situations based above any caudillo.
For a comparative study in Caudillismo in Latin America see for example Caudillos: Dictators in Spanish America Hugh M.
Moving at a greater speed would require getting our priorities straight: greater intra-regional trade and trade with the United States; less protectionism, more fiscal discipline, less economic populism, and more non-paternalistic social spending; strengthening justice systems and citizen security; providing guarantees for minorities; and leaving caudillismo, the rule of the strongman, behind.
Citing Gallegos's analysis, in his article entitled "Las causas," of the Venezuelan people's lack of political party affiliation and its strong attraction to caudillismo,
But it's not likely that we will come to an agreement, because the caudillismo and corruption within the PLC have not changed.
Together with the strong positivist influence inherited from the nineteenth century, caudillismo has placed the will over legislation and legislation over law to the point that we have been governed by a teleocracy (a government of objectives) instead of by a nomocracy (a government of laws)--to apply the formula used by Bertrand de Jouvenel.
In the pre-revolutionary years the ideas of the Enlightenment prevailed, gradually giving way to Romanticism and then the instrumental political theories that emphasized order over liberty and gave rise to the caudillismo associated with Juan Manuel de Rosas, who dominated Buenos Aires politics from the end of the 1820s through the early 1850s.