cauldron subsidence

cauldron subsidence

[′kȯl·drən səb′sī·dəns]
(geology)
A structure formed by the lowering along a steep ring fracture of a more or less cylindrical block, usually 1 to 10 miles (1.6 to 16 kilometers) in diameter, into a magma chamber.
The process of forming such a structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ground was selected after interpretations revealed numerous very large intrusions or cauldron subsidence areas known to be associated with the existing uranium deposits in the district.