causal


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causal

Philosophy (of a theory) explaining a phenomenon or analysing a concept in terms of some causal relation
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, there are no predicted causal connections between the objectives.
Essays 5-6 are, in my opinion, the brightest part of this collection and focus their attention on solving the problem of causal deviance.
If ozone is in fact on the causal pathway between temperature and mortality (which we posit below), controlling for ozone in a statistical model estimates the controlled direct effect of temperature on mortality, under certain assumptions (Petersen et al.
The prediction time was not significantly different between the two causal groups, however.
Within their theoretical framework, many scholars actually do not deduce causal configurations from theories but delineate a set of potential causal conditions like a set of "independent" (in both senses: explanatory and autonomous) variables in statistical analysis.
Causal explanation is intrinsically satisfying, and it bears within itself other forms of satisfaction.
In tracing the history, the article also highlights and underscores the assumptions that underlie efforts to estimate causal effects using observational data.
s (2002) results can be explained by a causal reasoning account of BB and IbC.
i) c causes e as follows iff c is an indispensable part of a sufficient causal condition d of e;
The causal factors underlying youth smoking initiation are central to the challenge of developing effective smoking prevention programs and the shaping of many other types of smoking-related policies.
What is the most frequently-cited aeromedical causal factor in naval aviation mishaps?
Mulling these through, Kern argues that causal understanding became ever more highly elaborated yet simultaneously ever less certainly bounded over the course of the period from 1830 to the present.