causal

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causal

Philosophy (of a theory) explaining a phenomenon or analysing a concept in terms of some causal relation
References in periodicals archive ?
The weight of the evidence in this study does not support a causal association between early exposure to mercury from thimerosal-containing vaccines and immune globulins administered prenatally or during infancy and neuropsychological functioning at the age of 7 to 10 years," they concluded.
We also need to expand the use of randomized controlled trials to test causal associations as well as the safety and efficacy of preventive interventions.
smallpox vaccination program for civilians and the military support a causal association between the vaccinations and myopericarditis.
In addition, a few well-designed epidemiological investigations of exposed populations should be conducted to see if there is a causal association between biosolids exposure and adverse health effects.
The finding that excess mortality is clustered in patients with poor quality of care suggests a causal association and the need for change.
Despite this weight of evidence, Melnick (2) has suggested that these epidemiologic data are "insufficient to permit a definite conclusion on the presence or absence of a causal association between exposure to lipid lowering drugs and cancer.
At the meeting of the FDA's panel, Pfizer representatives presented a review of the available clinical and postmarketing data, which they said showed no signal of a causal association between doxazosin and CHF, myocardial infarction, or stroke.
Whether there is a causal association between Accutane and depression and suicide was not resolved at either the FDA meeting or the congressional hearing, but Roche is now planning a study with the FDA and the National Institutes of Health to investigate the association.
Thus, a causal association between these environmental exposures and this decrease is unlikely.
Several studies have since indicated no causal association between the drug and valvular disorders.
Hopenhayn-Rich and colleagues point out that although there is suggestive evidence for the developmental effects of arsenic, a clear causal association cannot yet be established, although their findings of increased late fetal, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates lend further support to previous studies.
Moreover, three other cases were found to be coincidental because there were inconsistent causal association to immunization