causal

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causal

Philosophy (of a theory) explaining a phenomenon or analysing a concept in terms of some causal relation
References in periodicals archive ?
But Dretske (1988:38) thinks that it is false that a part of a whole could causally contribute to the existence of the whole.
The classical method itself can only be legitimately and usefully utilized if the scientist assumes that the world is causally-deterministic and will thus severely limit what can possibly occur, and probability can only be subjective in a causally deterministic world.
is currently licensed from the age of nine years, for the prevention of premalignant genital lesions (cervical, vulvar and vaginal) and cervical cancer causally related to certain oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types and genital warts (condyloma acuminata) causally related to specific HPV types.
which he called causality Synchronicity he considered, was the occurrence of two simultaneous events but not causally connected.
Though the third party is, like the attacker, not culpable for the attack, neither is she causally responsible for the harm inflicted by the attack.
Occupational vinyl chloride exposure has not been conclusively causally linked to any adverse health outcome, with the exception of angio-sarcoma of the liver.
Moreover, since our work focuses on description we attend to how (or if) characters grow and change, how plot episodes are causally or casually linked, how setting meets or exceeds our expectations of an ordinary world--students are less reluctant to venture their opinions than when they suspect I am fishing for obscure details about narrative technique.
He ultimately did succumb by having a subsequent medical episode that is causally connected to the prior assault.
The court found that it is well settled that "where causally related injuries from a claimant's employment precipitate, aggravate, or accelerate, a preexisting infirmity or disease, the resulting disability is compensable.
Among this group, 3 patients were found to have an obstructing lesion of the endolymphatic sac or duct that we felt was causally related to their Meniere's-like symptomatology.
First, Flanagan's general contention (as summarized by Sanchez) that "it would not count as an act of free will if some nondeterministic quantum fluctuation" causally contributed to an eventual action (an argument long rehashed since the advent of quantum physics) presupposes a myopic view of "freedom" and "self-authorship.