cautery


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to cautery: chemical cautery

cautery,

searing or destruction of living animal tissue by use of heat or caustic chemicals. In the past, cauterization of open wounds, even those following amputation of a limb, was performed with hot irons; this served to close off the bleeding vessels as well as to discourage infection. In modern times cautery is used only on small lesions, e.g., to close off a bleeding point in the nasal mucous membrane or to eradicate a wart or other benign lesion. This is accomplished either by the application of a caustic substance such as nitric acid, or by the use of an electrically charged platinum wire (electrocautery).

cautery

[′kȯd·ə·rē]
(medicine)
Any agent or device used to coagulate or destroy tissue by means of heat, cold, electric current, or caustic chemicals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: Monopolar cautery though causes decreased intraoperative blood loss however requires longer anesthesia and causes significant post operative pain to the patient.
Cautery artifact interfered with accurate staging in 7/119 (6%) of cases.
The treatment choices adopted in the present report like surgical excision, electro cautery etc.
After the turbinate is resected, suction cautery can be used to coagulate the raw edge.
Rather than focusing on alternative methods, we maintain that preventive measures to minimise skin flap complications should reinforce basic surgical principles: avoiding skin closure under tension; ensuring adequate perfusion to the flaps by respecting the recommended thickness and length; and minimising the use of cautery, which invariably leads to a degree of burn.
He said: "Sometimes the softpalate cautery is done at the same time because it is not a particularly difficult operation and it has very few complications.
A retrospective cohort study audited recurrence rates in 408 patients (mean age 41 years, range 5 months to 90 years) whose pyogenic granulomas were treated with either surgical excision or combinations of curettage, shave, and cautery.
However, newer technology in the form of nasal endoscopes and bipolar nasal cautery probes potentially permits the localisation and cauterisation of the bleeding site in an awake patient in an outpatient setting.
There was a threefold increase in complications in patients who were American Society of Anesthesiologists class III, compared with class I or II patients; a fivefold increase in patients who took warfarin, compared with those who used aspirin or NSAIDs; and a fivefold increase for a polyp removed with cautery.
Patients were crossed over to cautery if bleeding lasted more than 15 minutes or if there was more than 100 mL of blood loss.