caution


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caution

1. Law chiefly Brit a formal warning given to a person suspected or accused of an offence that his words will be taken down and may be used in evidence
2. a notice entered on the register of title to land that prevents a proprietor from disposing of his land without a notice to the person who entered the caution
References in periodicals archive ?
Cautions don't count as criminal convictions but they can show up on criminal record checks.
An offender must admit they are guilty of the crime in order to be given a caution.
Caution is applied in most of our lives without thought, and that instinct can help keep most of us safe.
Dixy Chicken's manager, Yasir Nasir, and owner, Mohammed Naeem, received cautions for the sale of hot food without a premises licence.
Mr Francis' barrister Hugh Southey QC said there was no "reliable" admission prior to the caution, meaning the caution was "unlawfully administered".
The proliferation of cautions for such serious offences is extremely worrying and a damning statement on justice - the police, courts and others - which says they are still failing to care properly for child victims.
Rather than a simple review of statistics, it should examine the varied operational environment police officers work in and the complexity of the current caution regime.
The Policing Minister says a review into police cautions is being launched by the Government to make sure more criminals are brought to court.
If you have noisy gear, slap this black and yellow caution plate on it: CAUTION High Intensity Noise Hearing Protection Required.
Any player reaching 15 cautions for the season, regardless of when, will be hit by a three-match ban.
He said: "The offender must understand the significance of a caution and give informed consent to being cautioned.
Ruth Hall, of Women Against Rape, said most men would consider a caution a "slap on the wrist".