cavalier


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Related to cavalier: Cavalier poets

cavalier

(kăv'əlĭr`), in general, an armed horseman. In the English civil war the supporters of Charles I were called Cavaliers in contradistinction to the RoundheadsRoundheads,
derisive name for the supporters of Parliament during the English civil war. The name, which originated c.1641, referred to the short haircuts worn by some of the Puritans in contrast to the fashionable long-haired wigs worn by many of the supporters of King Charles
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, the followers of Parliament. The royalists used the designation until it was replaced by ToryTory
, English political party. The term was originally applied to outlaws in Ireland and was adopted as a derogatory name for supporters of the duke of York (later James II) at the time (c.
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.

cavalier

1. A raised portion of a fortress for commanding adjacent defenses or for the placement of weapons.
2. A small tower on the ridge of a double-pitched roof.

cavalier

1. a gallant or courtly gentleman, esp one acting as a lady's escort
2. Archaic a horseman, esp one who is armed

Cavalier

a supporter of Charles I during the English Civil War
References in classic literature ?
Luigi slowly relinquished Teresa's arm, which he had held beneath his own, and Teresa, accompanied by her elegant cavalier, took her appointed place with much agitation in the aristocratic quadrille.
He bowed respectfully to the king, who gave him a somewhat cavalier reception, but a look from his mother reproved him for the hatred which, from his infancy, Louis XIV.
He who starts on a deliberate quest of adventure goes forth but to gather dead-sea fruit, unless, indeed, he be beloved of the gods and great amongst heroes, like that most excellent cavalier Don Quixote de la Mancha.
The islanders looked upon the people who made this cavalier appropriation of their shores with mingled feelings of fear and detestation.
Mademoiselle de Montalais was right; the young cavalier was goodly to look upon.
She came flying out of the gate on horseback and it would have been all I would have seen of her if - and this is for you, Signorino - if she hadn't pulled up in the main alley to wait for a very good-looking cavalier.
Baisemeaux, seated at table, was rubbing his hands and looking at the bishop of Vannes, who, booted like a cavalier, dressed in gray and sword at side, kept talking of his hunger and testifying the liveliest impatience.
But, Edricson, do I not see a cavalier who rides down yonder road amongst the nether shaw?
Here are two written by Richard Lovelace, the very model of a gay cavalier.
Rupert's Cavaliers were every bit as particular about their lace collars and frills as the lady whose pretty limbs once warmed this cambric.
When the Parliament got the power into their hands, they likewise had enough to do in keeping down the Cavaliers.
All at once, a great galloping of horses filled the neighboring streets, and, with a long file of torches and a thick column of cavaliers, with free reins and lances in rest, these furious sounds debouched on the Place like a hurricane,--