cavern


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cavern

a cave, esp when large and formed by underground water, or a large chamber in a cave

Cavern

 

a cavity that develops in body organs where there is destruction and death (necrosis) of tissues and subsequent liquefaction of the necrotic masses.

Caverns may be closed, not communicating with the external environment, or open, when contents of the cavern empty to the outside through natural channels. Caverns appear most often at the site of a purulent necrotic process or specific inflammation in the lungs (cavernous tuberculosis), kidneys (an abscess that opens into the renal pelvis), or liver (a suppurative node of Echinococcus that empties into the biliary tract). The presence of a cavern fosters the spread of the pathological process and the development of complications (hemorrhage, perforation).

[11–-318–2]

cavern

[′kav·ərn]
(geology)
An underground chamber or series of chambers of indefinite extent carved out by rock springs in limestone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report highlights impact of natural gas trading on the growth of salt cavern type underground storage sites in the US.
The ventilation shaft was never built, but The Cavern was filled in during construction work.
The cheese is stored for three months 500ft underground at Llechwedd Slate Caverns, Blaenau Ffestiniog, in what is believed to be the world's deepest mining maturation cavern.
Over half a century later, the latest incarnation of the Cavern is still thriving with resident tribute bands and original acts performing seven days a week.
Leaching equipment, including pumps and motors, will control the water flow down each well to create the desired shape of each cavern.
com A natural cave system tunnelled into by miners for over 5,000 years, there are nine large caverns to visit and geological displays.
Bill Heckle, chairman of Cavern City Tours, said: 'This is a fantastic opportunity to spread the name of the Beatles and the Cavern Club around the world.
Unlike rock-climbing rappels where you ``bounce and bound'' down the side of a rock face, here much of the descent is out in the middle of the main cavern.
The cave was first used by humans and animals around half a million years ago - all the visitors over these years have left items behind, making Kents Cavern a giant natural treasure chest of historical interest.
Most likely, these small arthropods had once lived in the soil and fallen leaves outside the cavern but had adapted to life underground.
To anyone from London, where the usually old and often grubby stations are invigorated by a profusion of lively advertising posters, the Bilbao caverns seem a bit austere and empty.
Bringing cavern three in service strengthens our ability to meet the needs of the marketplace and build on that track record," said Murrell.