ceiling effect


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ceiling effect

[′sēl·iŋ i‚fekt]
(psychology)
In testing, the actual limitation on a person's test score as the maximum score is approached or the limit on the performance of some task.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scale scores were high across all time points and all groups, thus reducing variability and introducing ceiling effect concerns.
Theoretically, benzodiazepines have a ceiling effect in GABAA-mediated pharmacological actions, and further increasing doses will not lead to heightened CNS depression.
An outcome measure could work well for one group of individuals but demonstrate a ceiling effect for another.
There does seem to be a ceiling effect, however, the authors noted, with no discernible impact beyond an annual per capita consumption of 350kg, as Finland's Nobel haul seems to attest.
One study (using an intravenous formulation of acetaminophen now available for post-operative patients) has suggested that this ceiling effect on analgesia may occur at lower levels than currently recommended dosing for acetaminophen.
Glass Ceiling Commission observes that the glass ceiling effect is a transparent unbreakable barrier that keeps the minorities and women from rising to the upper rungs of the corporate ladder, despite their qualifications and achievement (as cited in Mattis 2004).
Participants have the chance to understand the business, learn how to tackle the 'glass ceiling effect,' get the right work-life balance and have the ability to plan their professional and business goals.
These drugs have no ceiling effect but are associated with side effects such as nausea, constipation, and sedation that must be managed to ensure patients' adherence.
Many of the self-report questionnaires that have been used to measure functional limitations and disability in the past are not sensitive to small changes and have a ceiling effect in higher functioning populations.
It appears that the glass ceiling effect on women's advancement may reflect not only general negative stereotypes about the competencies of women but also weight bias that results in the application of stricter appearance standards to women.
The ceiling effect refers to when the initial (in this case pre-test) data in a paired comparison are so high (e.