celiac


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Related to celiac: celiac artery, Celiac diet

celiac

[′sēl·ē‚ak]
(anatomy)
Of, in, or pertaining to the abdominal cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 1990, Celiac Disease Foundation has been educating physicians and the public about diagnosing, living and thriving with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity.
3) If you have confirmed non-celiac gluten-sensitivity and celiac disease, you should begin a gluten-free diet, strictly avoiding wheat, barley and rye any food products made with them or their presence in any ready-made or processed foods.
This project is based on two important observations by my group: (1) Our genetic studies, which led to identifying 39 celiac disease risk loci, suggest that the mechanism underlying the disease is largely governed by dysregulation of gene expression.
The traditional diagnosis of celiac disease depends on confirmation of villous atrophy, cryptic livperplasia, or intraepithelial lymphocytosis in samples collected during small intestinal biopsy.
It's unclear just how celiac disease arises, and it can crop up at any point in life.
As time goes on, though, it becomes easier and easier to live with celiac disease, Lawrence said.
Elfstrom of Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm and his colleagues reviewed data from 28,882 Swedish patients with celiac disease that was confirmed by biopsy showing villous atrophy in the small intestine (Clin.
For example, something may have changed in the way we grow, process, and eat wheat that may have affected our likelihood of getting celiac disease.
Green, MD, director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University--to be diagnosed.
Celiac disease is a digestive disorder triggered by the protein gluten.
Willem-Karel Dicke recognized the association between consumption of wheat and manifestation of clinical symptoms (11); during the Second World War when food was in very short supply he observed that children with celiac disease flourished on a diet that did not contain wheat, providing a clue to the aetiology of the disease.
The researchers matched celiac patients with control participants who had similar characteristics, but did not have celiac disease.