cenote


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cenote

[sə′nōd·ē]
(civil engineering)
References in periodicals archive ?
POSH FLOCK: The parrots at Xcaret; WELL, WELL: Cooling Ik Kil cenote, main pic; from top: Ball Court at Chichen Itza; El Castillo at Tulum; local handicrafts including rugs for sale
So far, the 115-foot-deep well is the most impressive find, said University of Texas archeologist Sam Wilson, because it is the first ceremonial cenote ever discovered at a Taino site.
Chichen Itza costs $49, Coba Aktunchen and Cenote costs $75.
For a better sense of nontourist Mexico, head for Merida (with a stop on the way at the Cenote Dzitnup, a wondrous limestone grotto with a nearly round freshwater pool, perfect for swimming.
This inference is supported by the existence of the pigment on a ball of copal from Tikal and one from the Cenote of Sacrifice at Chichen Itza (Cabrera Garrido 1969: 20-2; Shepard 1962; Shepard & Gottlieb 1962; Shepard & Pollock 1971), and on fragments of incense burners and along with soot and copal that came from the Aztec market site of Tlateloco in what is now Mexico City (Cabrera Garrido 1969: 15).
Conjuring up a vision of the past, the cave with the cool-water cenote holds a small statue of an alux, or Maya elf, with offerings of fresh flowers.
While surveying satellite images of Mexico's Yucatan peninsula in the mid-1980s, these remote-sensing experts noticed a strange semicricle of sinkhole lakes, called cenotes by local residents.
Sporting one of the most beautiful beaches on the island, it has a lagoon created by a cenote, which connects to the sea by an underground channel.
The spa is on a private island and surrounds a cenote of natural limestone pool fed by subterranean springs.
Over a century ago, Edward Thompson, one of the pioneers of Maya archaeology (best known for his dredging operations in the Sacred Cenote of Chichen Itza), investigated a series of small mounds at Labna in Yucatan, concluding that they were, from their form, abundance and similarity to the substructures of contemporary Maya dwellings, the remains of houses.
A small cenote (underground water reservoir) along the path was once dedicated to the Mayan god of rain, Chaac, who was thought to live underground in watery realms.
Recognized by Travel + Leisure magazine as "One of the 35 Great Adventures in the World," Selvatica offers a Canopy Tour through the jungle that consists of an unparalleled eleven zip lines, mountain biking, and swimming in a private, serene cenote.