centralism

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centralism

the principle or act of bringing something under central control; centralization
References in periodicals archive ?
Widely unnoticed, Iraqi Sunni and Shia centralists have managed in the last couple of months to form a united parliamentary platform that leaves sectarian tensions behind.
The answer is, a hybrid-populist, one who is at the same time a cultural and values conservative and a constitutional radical, a centralist prime minister in a federal system for which (he estimates correctly) most Australians have as little time as himself, and of which they have less understanding.
5 referendum to declare the country a confederation of autonomous regions and call for resistance to centralist governance.
They have stated that presently the Liberals are too centralist and the NDP too social-democratic; they believe the Conservatives may be the more appropriate choice for their cause.
The first chapter is primarily an exploration of the centralist methods of private law unification, which Smits views as a less effective way of achieving unification.
But at the British Medical Association meeting in Torquay yesterday Ian Wilson, from Dewsbury district hospital, said: "We will not see our ability to care for our patients undermined by a Stalinist, centralist, control freak agenda.
In this insightful essay, Pasquier's centralist vision and his legislative impulse toward language serve to heighten by contrast the individualism and independence of Montaigne's style.
The cohabitation of centralist bureaucrats and randy literary types gives the effect of a Stanislaw Leto novel taken over virtually in midsentence by Gilbert Sorrentino.
For decades after achieving independence, Tanzania and its citizenry suffered from economic decline brought about by ill-conceived centralist economic policies.
While attempts were made by regional leaders to change this, centralist stalwarts managed to keep it off the table.
Telecommunications is thus a top-down, centralist spectacle of and for big business.
Throughout the 19th century, and especially in its latter half, a centralist political model for Spain was developed in which a political balance could not be found between the State and the autonomous traditions of the various regions of the Iberian Peninsula.