tonsil

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tonsil

1. either of two small masses of lymphatic tissue situated one on each side of the back of the mouth
2. Anatomy any small rounded mass of tissue, esp lymphatic tissue

Tonsil

Localized aggregation of diffuse and nodular lymphoid tissue found in the region where the nasal and oral cavities open into the pharynx. The tonsils are important sources of blood lymphocytes. They often become inflamed and enlarged, necessitating surgical removal.

The two palatine (faucial) tonsils are almond-shaped bodies measuring 1 by 0.5 in. (2.5 by 1.2 cm) and are embedded between folds of tissue connecting the pharynx and posterior part of the tongue with the soft palate. These are the structures commonly known as the tonsils. The lingual tonsil occupies the posterior part of the tongue surface. It is really a collection of 35–100 separate tonsillar units, each having a single crypt surrounded by lymphoid tissue. Each tonsil forms a smooth swelling about 0.08– 0.16 in. (2–4 mm) in diameter. The pharyngeal tonsil (called adenoids when enlarged) occupies the roof of the nasal part of the pharynx. This tonsil may enlarge to block the nasal passage, forcing mouth breathing. See Lymphatic system

tonsil

[′tän·səl]
(anatomy)
Localized aggregation of diffuse and nodular lymphoid tissue found in the throat where the nasal and oral cavities open into the pharynx.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 mm increase of basion-atlas interval), anterior flexion of the occipitoatlantal joint (8 degree decrease of clivus-axis angle), increased basilar impression, and cerebellar ptosis with downward displacement of cerebellar tonsils to C-1 (white arrow).
Chiari I malformation is characterized by low-lying cerebellar tonsils (Figure 6).
Spontaneous CSF leaks also can cause generalized sagging of the brain with downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils that is clearly visible on MRI with gadolinium.
There may also be descent of the cerebellar tonsils, obliteration of prepontine, perichiasmatic cisterns, flattening of the optic chiasm, crowding of the posterior fossa, as well as decreased ventricular size, according to Dr.
The findings of massive cerebral edema included flattened gyri, narrowed sulci, obliteration of the lateral and fourth ventricles, and herniation of the cerebellar tonsils.