cerebration


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

cerebration

[ser·ə′brā·shən]
(psychology)
The act or process of using the mind; thinking.
References in periodicals archive ?
Collaborative cerebration and schooling in a determined group of learners generates a setting where actors can investigate and inspect initiatives (Lazaroiu, 2015a, b, c; 2016) while confronting personal prejudices.
In modern terms, Coleridge is especially relevant in researching the role of the brain regions where the unconscious cerebration is believed to take place during Eureka-like creative processes.
Every torn-out piece of telephone equipment, every handle wrenched off a fire safety door, every kicked-in electricity meter represented a stand against de- cerebration.
Much of what passes for "thought" is simply cerebration in the presence of a topic.
38) It "often tempt[s] the lazy judge away from the proper task of creative thinking to the easier work of finding platitudes that will serve in the place of robust cerebration.
As one who has supposedly seen the detrimental bodily effects of higher education, Clarke warns that "The results are monstrous brains and puny bodies; abnormally active cerebration, and abnormally weak digestion; flowing thoughts and constipated bowels; lofty aspirations and neuralgic sensations" (41).
It seems to me, then, that the purpose of cerebration sessions is not to think up new ideas but to educate the participants in facts and fact combinations, in theories and vagrant thoughts.
Stakeholders are participants that have various functions in the improvement of eHealth technologies, from cerebration to operationalization.
Mr Nodua informed that mobile phones will be available for sale at special prizes during those launching to the mark the cerebration.
Through a study of several of George Eliot's novels, chapters two and three build on the foundations laid out in the preceding sections by addressing the pressing question the phenomenon of unconscious cerebration immediately begs; Ryan writes, Eliot "explored the basic paradox that a person could act without a sense of volition and considered the questions about responsibility that emerged from the notion that human actions previously regarded as volitional were largely automatic .
For example among Arabs', Islam was able to form a synchronized army and occupy almost a whole continent as a result of cerebration, collaboration and unity against individual activities.
1) Stevens's lines from "Sombre Figuration" define the wrong kind of mental activity: laborious cerebration merely circulating in "The cycle of the solid" (168).