cesarean section


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

cesarean section

(sĭzâr`ēən), delivery of an infant by surgical removal from the uterus through an abdominal incision. The operation is of ancient origin: indeed, the name derives from the legend that Julius Caesar was born in this fashion. Until advancements in the late 19th cent., the mother generally died in surgery. The procedure was also aided by antisepsis, anesthetics, and other developments that made surgery as a whole more successful. Cesarean section is performed nowadays when factors exist that make natural childbirth hazardous, such as an abnormally narrow pelvis, pelvic tumors, hemorrhage, active infection with herpes simplexherpes simplex
, an acute viral infection of the skin characterized by one or more painful, itching blisters filled with clear fluid. It is caused by either of two herpes simplex viruses: Type 1, herpes labialis,
..... Click the link for more information.
, multiple births, or an abnormal position of the fetus within the uterus. Subsequent deliveries are largely also by cesarean section. In the last few decades there has been a significant increase in the number of cesarean sections performed; among the factors encouraging the rise are the increase in malpractice litigation arising from problems attendant to vaginal deliveries and the information provided by the many new devices that monitor the well-being of the fetus in the uterus.

cesarean section

[sə′zer·ē·ən ′sek·shən]
(medicine)
Delivery of the fetus through an abdominal incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
In an attempt to quantify the risks of VBAC, a systematic review determined that attempted VBAC, compared with repeat low-transverse cesarean section, increased the risk of uterine rupture by 2.
Educating and empowering women and other family members about the risks and benefits of cesarean sections will make them better advocates for their own care.
Finally, although it has long been known that a cesarean section baby is more likely to have transient tachypnea of the newborn (a usually mild event), an elective cesarean section at term would decrease such risks to the fetus of postmaturity syndrome and intrapartum mortality and morbidity.
The most common causes of perinatal mortality among infants born to women who had had a cesarean section but expected a vaginal delivery were mechanical factors (uterine rupture, umbilical cord compression or prolapse, birth trauma and asphyxia) and oxygen deprivation during birth: The rate for each was 4.
Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most common surgical procedures today.
Of the 30 women who underwent modified panniculectomy at the time of cesarean section, there was one operative site infection that required readmission.
KEY WORDS: Vaginal birth after cesarean, Low segment cesarean section, Trial of labor.
Doctor's defense Both preparation of the mother for surgery and performance of the cesarean section were timely.
Elective primary cesarean section is a controversial and highly debated topic," Dr.
For elective repeat cesarean, the consensus of dozens of studies totaling tens of thousands of women is that elective repeat cesarean section is riskier for the mother and not any safer for the baby.
Methods: A survey regarding VTE prophylaxis and cesarean section was sent to 113 obstetricians practicing in suburban Chicago and northern Wisconsin.
Nevertheless, the new study suggests that women who elect vaginal birth after a cesarean section are taking an unnecessary risk, comments physician Michael F.