cesium-134

cesium-134

[′sē·zē·əm ‚wən‚thərd·ē′fȯr]
(nuclear physics)
An isotope of cesium, atomic mass number of 134; emits negative beta particles and has a half-life of 2.19 years; used in photoelectric cells and in ion propulsion systems under development.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radioactive cesium is used to measure the density level of radioactive substances, and the half-life of one type of cesium, cesium-134, is about two years.
FUKUSHyMA (CyHAN)- Trace amounts of Cesium-134 and Cesium-137 have for the first time been discovered in samples collected off the coast of the town of Ucluelet, located on Vancouver Island in the Canadian province of British Columbia, according to scientist Ken Buesseler of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
For a six-month period from October 2011 through March 2012, the researchers collected readings of participants' levels of cesium-134 and -137 using a whole-body counter.
The Nuclear Regulation Authority has told TEPCO it will authorize the Fukushima plant to discharge water from within the barriers only if radiation readings are below 15 becquerels per liter for cesium-134, below 25 becquerels per liter for cesium-137, and below 10 becquerels per liter for strontium-90 and if other radioactive substances that emit gamma rays are not present.
Reports have claimed that the contaminated water with 15 times higher levels of cesium-134 and cesium-137 could rise to the ground's surface within three weeks.
It came mostly in the form of iodine-131, cesium-134 and cesium-137, the primary radioisotopes released from the reactors, reported Ken Buesseler, a marine chemist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
However, some aspects are predictable, such as cesium-134, cesium-137, strontium-90, various forms of plutonium, americium, and iodine-131.
The system's analysis capability is targeted at detection of radioactive cesium-134 and -137.
above the provisional regulation values for cesium-134 and cesium-137.
Soil samples taken at nine spots at the plant port in late November contained as many as 870,000 becquerels of cesium-137 per kilogram of soil and 730,000 becquerels of cesium-134 per kilogram of soil, according to Tokyo Electric Power Co.
The report does not include cesium-134 as the research group initially lacked resources to measure it, meaning the amount of estimated radioactive material will increase with further calculations.
The contaminated water in the pit contained radioactive cesium-134 at a