cesspit

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cesspit

[′ses‚pit]
(civil engineering)

cesspool

cesspool
1. A lined and covered excavation in the ground which receives the discharge of domestic sewage or other organic wastes from a drainage system, so designed as to retain the organic matter and solids, but permitting the liquids to seep through the bottom and sides; also called a leaching cesspool or pervious cesspool.
2. (Brit.) A wooden box, usually lead-lined, constructed in a roof or gutter, to collect rainwater, which then passes to a downpipe.
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Being buried for centuries in the sewers and cesspits helped preserve food traces -- Vesuvius' eruption also carbonized some food for posterity.
There are some important differences between a cesspit and a septic tank.
The cesspit or septic tank may be located within the boundaries of a property or may be within the boundaries to a neighbours' property and could be exclusively used by the property you are purchasing or used in common with other nearby properties.
According to excavation reports over 40 medieval cesspits have been found in Tartu (Tvauri 2008, 140).
A total of 25 cesspits were selected for the trial, a group of 5 cesspits each was allocated randomly for each dosage and control.
In a letter to Northumbrian Water, which has gone out to all UK water companies, DWI chief Professor Jeni Colbourne has advised them to carry out checks on all sewage pipes, campsites, cesspits and septic tanks and check the capability of water tanks to be shut down in heavy rainfall.
Although the One NorthEast website proclaims that we are passionate people, it appears we are not passionate enough to care about the rising tide of litter which is turning our roadsides into cesspits.
At a time when we are endeavouring to encourage our children and - with no lesser gravity - the citizens of such cholesterol cesspits as Merthyr, to appreciate the importance of wholesome, healthy food, The Western Mail revels in the image of a grown man pondering how to eat a Clark's Pie.
Among the working class of today there is little appetite for any community-based action to set right some obvious wrongs especially in the Valleys where living conditions are probably the worst in Europe and which are cesspits of crime and lethargy.