cetology


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cetology

[sē′täl·ə·jē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The study of whales.
References in periodicals archive ?
Burnett (2012) ends his history of cetology by connecting "Nuke the Whales" to the vast apparatus of military-industrial science, institutional profiteering, and cultural wonder that marks the human-whale encounter across the 20th-century.
In fact, it may be the characteristic text of encyclopedic novels: to name three other examples, similar purposelessness can be seen in the pseudo-scientific cetology chapter of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick, the idiotic minor-character chatter about art and economics in William Gaddis's The Recognitions and J R, and the endless catalogs of nondescript minor poets in Roberto Bolano's novels.
James read Moby-Dick aloud, every last word, including the cetology stuff, to the five-year-old boy and his three-year-old sister.
Then, as you say, The voyage begun, enter the Cetology of
He ignores the taxonomic distinction in his cetology in spite of chapters LXXIV, "The Sperm Whale's Head," and LXXV, "The Right Whale's Head.
The costumes, like the endless representations of the whale in cetology, are not so much false as, taken each by itself, inadequate.
Still, that Hayes slights Moby-Dick's cetology sections, the notorious "Squeeze of the Hand" chapter, and the character Pip, so important to Stuckey's analysis, is surprising.
No branch of Zoology is so much involved as that which is entitled Cetology," says Captain Scoresby, A.
In his long chapter on horror fiction, he thoroughly disparages those academics who disagree with his convictions that story is more important than theme, mood, tone, symbol, style, and even characterization and that it is "impervious to analysis"; such critics "would feel vastly more comfortable if Moby-Dick were a doctoral thesis on cetology rather than an account of what happened on the Pequod's final voyage.
Clearly, some of the more brutal cetology in Crevecoeur's heavily ironic account of whaling off Martha's Vineyard demands to be called "Melvillean"; and one can only wonder what thought the fierceness of Crevecoeur's little hummingbird might have inspired in a so pacific a botanist: "Where do passions find room in so diminutive a body?
Melville is such a great storyteller that listening to this fine audiobook provides a whole new experience of the narrative as well as the many passages about religion, history, and philosophy and even the somewhat lengthy "digression" on cetology.