Chalcides

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Chalcides

 

a genus of lizards of the family Scincidae. The legs, especially the forelegs, are small and weak, and the digits may vary in number from five to one. The genus underwent two major changes in its evolutionary development: a reduction in the number and size of the digits and an elongation of the body, which acquired a more or less snakelike shape. The body may reach 50 cm in length; the tail constitutes approximately one-half of the body length.

The genus embraces 15 species, which are distributed in Southern Europe, Southwest Asia, and Africa. The animals live on dry rocky and sandy soils. The most common representatives are C. ocellatus and C. chalcides. The lizards are usually ovoviviparous; there are up to ten young per litter.

References in periodicals archive ?
Seed-infesting chalcids of the genus Megastigmus Dalman, 1820 (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) native and introduced to the west Palaearctic region: taxonomy, host specificity and distribution.
The associations for the multistate descriptors with early flowering, tannin, pod, chalcid, leaf, and FRI were also determined.
Structure of the parasitoid communities of grass-feeding chalcid wasps.
Chalcid Corner should fill that need because it is geared to nonexpert audiences--like farmers, home gardeners, and others not knowledgeable about insect taxonomy.
Burnett (1960) showed that the oviposition rate of the chalcid wasp Dahlbominus fuscipennis was greatly reduced under low to moderate host densities at temperatures [Less than] 17.
1993) could find no direct hybrid effect on parasitism, but that chalcid parasitism of cynipid galls was positively related to gall density and cynipid clutch size.
Some to be aware of are the predatory wasps (the kinds that sting) and the parasitic trichogramma, braconid, chalcid, and ichneumon wasps (the kinds that don't).
The genera of chalcid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) of citrus leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae).
Because of their small size and lack of specialized mouthparts, certain chalcid wasp species can efficiently forage only in flowers with nectaries that are fully exposed or only slightly obstructed by petals or other floral parts (Patt et al.
Effectiveness of insecticides against blue gum chalcid Leptocybe invasa Fisher & La Salle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), infesting eucalyptus seedlings in middle Gujarat, India.