change of tide

change of tide

[′chānj əv ‚tīd]
(oceanography)
A reversal of the direction of motion (rising or falling) of a tide, or in the set of a tidal current. Also known as turn of the tide.
References in classic literature ?
Setting his watches for that night again, so that vigilant eyes should be kept on every change of tide, he went home exhausted.
The change of tide initiated the most spectacular two-hour permit tailing binge I've ever seen.
On to the rower, I start off a bit slower But wait till I get into my stride; I will be there and back to New Brighton well before the next change of tide.
The yacht was towed first to Alnmouth Bay to await a change of tide before being towed into Amble harbour.
The first sample during all surveys was collected just before the change of tide and sampling then continued for the next 2 semidiurnal tidal cycles.
He was attacked by 11 gun-boats, fou r of which he sunk and, upon the change of tide, he brought his ship out without her having sustained any material damage.
The current administration's focus on renewable energy and the sustainability provisions within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) have signaled a change of tide in Washington.
Although, as always, Ziedan's impeccable writing style never ceases to impress, methodological problems and ghosts of historical selectivity hinder the reader from reaching Ziedan's conclusion (that Egyptian Muslims and Copts have existed peacefully for a long time; the change of tides propelled by extremists on both sides is fairly recent).
The tides run hard around the inlets but a half hour before and a half hour after the change of tides allows for easy snook fishing.