chapter


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Related to chapter: Chapter 11

chapter

1. a numbered reference to that part of a Parliamentary session which relates to a specified Act of Parliament
2. the collective body or a meeting of the canons of a cathedral or collegiate church or of the members of a monastic or knightly order
3. a general assembly of some organization

Chapter

 

(1) In the Catholic and Anglican churches, the college of canons of the cathedral, making up a council working under the bishop to govern the diocese, or eparchy. Upon the death of the bishop, the diocese is governed by individuals who have been selected by the cathedral chapter from among its own membership. These individuals govern until the arrival of the new bishop.

(2) In Catholic monastic orders, as well as in religious orders of knights, the board of leaders.

11–1063–1]

References in classic literature ?
When Tar and Sighs were walking together to the Chapter House on Speech-Day a week later, Tar, who had a bitter tongue, remarked to his colleague:
That very chapter 'at you've just been reading troubled me as much as aught--"He that loveth not, knoweth not God.
And, further to tempt him, the very last chapter of Labour Tactics and Strategy remained unwritten for lack of a trifle more of essential data which he had neglected to gather.
Bill Totts could shirk at a job with clear conscience, while Freddie Drummond condemned shirking as vicious, criminal, and un-American, and devoted whole chapters to condemnation of the vice.
In the next chapter I shall discuss the complex and little known laws of variation and of correlation of growth.
Compare 'Absalom and Achitophel' with the source in II Samuel, Chapter XIII, verse 23, to Chapter XVIII.
read either (1) one of the essays, for example that on Olive or Bacon or Pitt or Chatham or Warren Hastings, or (2) a chapter in the History.
I know that the tune I am piping is a very mild one (although there are some terrific chapters coming presently), and must beg the good- natured reader to remember that we are only discoursing at present about a stockbroker's family in Russell Square, who are taking walks, or luncheon, or dinner, or talking and making love as people do in common life, and without a single passionate and wonderful incident to mark the progress of their loves.
Franklin Blake presents his compliments to Miss Clack, and begs to thank her for the fifth chapter of her narrative.
In the meanwhile she would be glad to know, before beginning the final chapters of her narrative, whether she may be permitted to make her humble contribution complete, by availing herself of the light which later discoveries have thrown on the mystery of the Moonstone.
Hence the author attaches particular importance to the public knowing for a certainty that the chapters here added have not been made expressly for this reprint.
Now the chapters have been found, and he avails himself of the first opportunity to restore them to their place.