charcoal canister

charcoal canister

[′chär‚kōl ′kan·ə′stər]
(mechanical engineering)
In an evaporative control system, a container filled with activated charcoal that traps gasoline vapors emitted by the fuel system. Also known as canister; carbon canister.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The faulty valve may allow fuel to leak over into the vehicle's charcoal canister, which can be a potential fire hazard.
TOM: To contain the vapors and prevent air pollution, your fuel system is kept under constant pressure, so the vapors are pushed into a charcoal canister, where they're trapped and held.
The two most common devices used for measuring indoor radon concentrations are the alpha track detector and the charcoal canister.
Charcoal canister or pressurized vent systems are available.
They are vented from your gas tank into a charcoal canister on your vehicle, which absorbs the fuel vapor and stores it until the engine is started and the vapors can be purged.
Measuring radon levels in a home has traditionally required leaving a charcoal canister in the living area for 4 to 7 days, or a more sophisticated alpha (radiation)-track device in the home for up to a year.
The Enviro-Fill pressure relief system will allow the boat builder to meet the EPA requirements for capturing fuel vapor (emissions) through either a pressure or a charcoal canister system.
Only the RTCA 4 Pass Charcoal Canister, $28, was accurate enough for Consumer Reports to recommend.
The most common test for radon is a do-it-yourself, short-term charcoal canister test that's available for about $20 at most hardware and home- improvement stores.
Several passive devices, including alpha track detectors, charcoal canisters, charcoal liquid scintillation detectors, and electret ion chambers, are all effective testing options.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) measurement protocols (except duplicate charcoal canisters were not deployed).
8-day half-life means that a week's collection in charcoal canisters -- the most common home monitors -- yields enough for a reasonable gauge of room levels.