charged particle


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charged particle

[′chärjd ′pärd·ə·kəl]
(particle physics)
A particle whose charge is not zero; the charge of a particle is added to its designation as a superscript, with particles of charge +1 and -1 (in terms of the charge of the proton) denoted by + and - respectively; for example, π+, Σ-.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words: abBA experiment; abBA spectrometer; charged particle trajectory; coincidence experiment; computer simulation; guiding center approximation.
The ionization chamber technique is employed to convert neutrons to charged particles in a large spatial region.
As it is known the magnetic field of a single charged particle has rotational characteristics.
In this region, the stream of charged particles from the sun, known as the solar wind, abruptly slowed down from supersonic speeds and became turbulent.
Other applications may be adversely affected by unwanted charged particle motion effects, for example, multipaction in high-power high-frequency applications, where the desired electrical power of a device leads to problems like sparking.
A small number of facilities around the world deliver radiation with charged particles such as protons and heavy ions (figure 5).
TESCAN USA has been fortunate to experience over 100% growth this year making us the fastest growing charged particle company in North America," said General Manager, Tony Owens.
Market Analytics III-41 Table 43: Canadian Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Microscopes by Product Segment - Optical Microscopes, Charged Particle Microscopes and Scanning Probe Microscopes Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Sales Figures in US$ Thousand for Years 2013 through 2020 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) III-41
Charged particles are forced to travel along the magnetic field lines that snake throughout space.
You may say that neither throwing a stone nor throwing a charged particle through the cloak is a big deal," he says.
5[degrees]) bend in the magnetic field direction at one end allowing the decay proton and electron to be guided out of the beam and into a charged particle detector held at a high negative potential ([approximately equal to] -30 kV) to accelerate the low energy protons to detectable energies.
The cloud is polarized, meaning that the strong negative charge at the core "pushes" the negatively charged particle in a pair slightly farther away from the core than the positively charged particle.