charger


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to charger: dodge, trickle charger, Phone charger

charger

1
a device for charging or recharging an accumulator or rechargeable battery

charger

2
Antiques a large dish for serving at table or for display

Charger

 

(1) An electrical-engineering device for charging storage and capacitor batteries (mainly the former type). It consists of a charging generator or a transformer with a current rectifier, and a power switchboard that contains voltage regulators and automatic circuit breakers. The power of the charger depends on the capacity of the batteries being charged and the rated duration of the charge.

Storage-battery chargers are used for periodic charging, compensating and interrupted recharging, and equalizing charging of storage batteries, which, as a rule, are first grouped according to their capacity and the strength of the charging current. For periodic charging the storage batteries are divided into two groups. The charger charges one of the two groups at a time. For compensating recharging the charger feeds the load circuit and simultaneously recharges the storage batteries. For interrupted recharging it feeds the load part of the time and recharges the storage battery; the rest of the time it serves as a standby under a low load. The load circuit is fed by the storage battery. Capacitor chargers are used to charge capacitors in the normal mode—that is, continuously up to the rated voltage.

Low-power single-phase rectifier chargers have a steeply falling external characteristic suitable for the charging conditions of storage batteries. The voltage is regulated by means of a tapped secondary transformer winding.

G. V. MIKHNEVICH

(2) In blasting operations, a charger is a mechanism or machine for filling a charge hole with explosives. Chargers are divided into two groups: units for charging stick powder that does not contain nitroethers or cyclonite and units for charging granulated explosives. The units in the first group have not become widespread because of their low efficiency, the inadequate charging density, and the high cost of suitable explosives. Chargers for granulated explosives are designed to charge descending blastholes in pits by gravity flow of bulk or fluid explosives (portable mixing and charging equipment that produces a mixture of the explosive components, such as igdanit or granular granulit, during the charging process and transporting and charging machines for factory-made explosives) and to charge blastholes and wells in any direction by pneumatic equipment. Pneumatic equipment is preferred for mines and is subdivided according to its principle of operation into ejector types, in which the explosive is sucked up from an open container by a vacuum in an ejector head and carried along by a stream of compressed air into a charging pipe, and pressure types, which force the explosive from a sealed container by compressed air. The pressure chargers transport the explosive along pipes or hoses for 200–300 m (including 80 m vertically) and force it into the hole with the required velocity. Chargers for fluid explosives containing water are divided into two groups: mobile machines, for moistening dry factory-made mixtures of the akvatol type, and mobile thermally insulated machines, for transporting granular components and a hot solution of ammonium nitrate (filler) and mixing them directly during the charging operation. The fluid explosive is forced into the hole by compressed air or a pump.

REFERENCE

Mekhanizcitsiia z.ariazhaniia VV. 2nd ed. Moscow, 1969.

G. P. DEMIDIUK and V. M. KOMIR

charger

[′chär·jər]
(electricity)

charger

A device that plugs into an AC outlet and delivers DC voltage to a rechargeable battery. See power adapter.
References in classic literature ?
All through the afternoon boiler-plated knights on mettlesome chargers had hurled themselves on each other's spears, to the vast contentment of all.
The lance of the black knight smote full upon the linden shield of his foeman, the staggering weight of the mighty black charger hurtled upon the gray who went down with his rider into the dust of the highway.
So silent and still were they, that they might have been metal-sheathed statues, were it not for the occasional quick, impatient stamp of their chargers, or the rattle of chamfron against neck-plates as they tossed and strained.
They seldom go into the scrummage, but must have more coolness than the chargers.
Captain Crawley of the Life Guards rode up from Knightsbridge Barracks the next day; his black charger pawed the straw before his invalid aunt's door.
But Raffles paid no attention to their fire; he was pointing downward through the bushes to where Corporal Connal stood with his back to us, shooing a last charger out of the mouth of the donga towards the Boer trenches.
To this, Joe made no answer, but beckoning Hugh, leaped into the saddle and rode away; and a very stalwart, manly horseman he looked, deserving a better charger than it was his fortune to bestride.
But, on the way down, they had stopped at a toy-shop, and had bought that noble charger, a description of whose points and trappings had on the last occasion conciliated the then worldly- minded orphan, and also a Noah's ark, and also a yellow bird with an artificial voice in him, and also a military doll so well dressed that if he had only been of life-size his brother-officers in the Guards might never have found him out.
During the night the Simpleton and his comrade went, together into a big field, not forgetting to take the bundle of wood with them, which the man spread out in all directions--and in a moment a mighty army stood upon the spot, regiment on regiment of foot and horse soldiers; the bugles sounded and the drums beat, the chargers neighed, and their riders put their lances in rest, and the soldiers presented arms.
They were all tales of adventure (happiest is he who writes of adventure), no characters were allowed within if I knew their like in the flesh, the scene lay in unknown parts, desert islands, enchanted gardens, with knights (none of your nights) on black chargers, and round the first corner a lady selling water-cress.
Once in the gait of the plunging bull, it was but a slight matter to vault to his back, as cavalrymen mount their chargers upon the run.
We must saddle our chargers and up and away, and all that sort of thing.