loose

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Related to cheap money: fiat money, Dear money

loose

1. 
a. (of the bowels) emptying easily, esp excessively; lax
b. (of a cough) accompanied by phlegm, mucus, etc.
2. the loose Rugby the part of play when the forwards close round the ball in a ruck or loose scrum
References in periodicals archive ?
The total value of cheap money banks can get hold of is tied to their lending to the real economy of consumers and smaller businesses.
The shift out of assets which have benefited most from cheap money has been sharpest in the U.
In the absence of sufficient activity growth in the real sector and amid persistent risks, a huge amount of cheap money is invested in gold.
7bn in the last quarter of 2012 according to recent data from the Bank of England - despite the government's efforts to extend cheap money to the banks via the Funding for Lending Scheme.
This is despite the government's efforts to extend cheap money to the banks via the Funding for Lending Scheme (FLS).
The FLS scheme has seen the Bank pump cheap money into banks and building societies, with the aim it should be lent to individuals and companies to help stimulate the economy.
In comments about the initiative to create the State Development Bank, Minister Sariev said: "We need long cheap money, this issue is hotly debated.
The market is now oversupplied with ships due to the abundance of cheap money following the financial crisis.
The current problem in Bahrain is that the will of youngsters is more towards destroying the country for some cheap money.
According to Angelovska, the sale of state land at the starting price of 1 euro per square meter will only benefit small number of citizens that are to buy land for cheap money.
CONSUMERS were warned yesterday that there would be no return to the era of cheap money, after tough new regulations were drawn up to boost capital reserves held by banks.
But those players were merely responding to the incentives provided by cheap money (courtesy of the Federal Reserve) and rapidly increasing property values.