chelating agent


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to chelating agent: EDTA

chelating agent

[′ke‚lād·iŋ ‚ā·jənt]
(organic chemistry)
An organic compound in which atoms form more than one coordinate bond with metals in solution.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chelating agents are primarily used for the following purposes:
Increasing the concentration of chelating agents disturbs the ionic interactions between LPS molecules, reducing the rigidity of aggregates.
The DMSA challenge did not affect barium, cadmium, manganese and uranium, suggesting that for these elements, DMSA may not be the chelating agent of choice.
The role of different chelating agents, timing of administration, and chelating efficacy seem to represent debated aspects in Co/Cr chelation and in clinical management of MOM hip-implanted patients [2, 13].
In association with chelating agents, it results in cleaner root walls that are free from smear layer.
Development of effective chelating agent is based on combinations of chemical considerations and whole animal experimentation on the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of metal and chelating agents, followed by clinical experience, with regard to monitoring metal excretion and status of tissue damage.
CONCLUSIONS: These are the first data, to our knowledge, to show that treatment with any chelating agent can alleviate cognitive deficits due to Pb exposure.
Chelating agents bind lead in soft tissues and are used in the treatment of lead poisoning to enhance urinary and biliary excretion of lead, thus decreasing total lead levels in the body (1).
The water is then circulated for eight to 12 hours after the addition of the chelating agent.
Antibiotic and chelating agent clioquinol has decreased AB deposition in trials.
Two types of assays have been described: those in which loosely bound iron is first mobilized with a chelating agent and the ultrafiltered complex is measured (3, 12-14); and assays in which a biologic reagent forms a complex with redox-active iron, causing a biochemical reaction that can be measured (15, 16).
This allows for the commercialisation of an environmentally friendly and readily biogradeable chelating agent.