carcinogen

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carcinogen:

see cancercancer,
in medicine, common term for neoplasms, or tumors, that are malignant. Like benign tumors, malignant tumors do not respond to body mechanisms that limit cell growth.
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carcinogen

[kär′sin·ə·jən]
(medicine)
Any agent that incites development of a carcinoma or any other sort of malignancy.

carcinogen

Pathol any substance that produces cancer
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the strongest liver cancer effect that I have seen with a chemical carcinogen.
Chromosome tests with 134 compounds on Chinese hamster cells in vitro: a screening for chemical carcinogens.
Not even over safety issues such as working with chemical carcinogens.
accept such case studies "as evidence in making causal inferences," especially about reactions to drugs, poisons, and chemical carcinogens.
DBM has been reported to antagonize the mutagenicity of several chemical carcinogens in vitro and has recently been shown to be even more effective than curcumin in suppressing the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumors in rats.
He is concerned about glyphosate, an herbicide ingredient that can break down to chemical carcinogens under certain conditions.
A better question would be, "How many lives can we save if we remove chemical carcinogens from the air?
At the end of the book, I stake out a philosophical argument about the use of chemical carcinogens and our dependence on them in our economy.
A: In studies where animals are given large doses of powerful chemical carcinogens, many of the phytochemicals showed potent anti-carcinogenic activity.
It can effectively neutralize or minimize the damaging effect of most chemical carcinogens in food and the environment.
Researchers are attempting to understand that potential link as a way of determining whether chemical carcinogens may be responsible for the onset of a subset of B precursor childhood ALL, the most common form of leukemia in children.
Robson in the 1940s, and by the 1960s scientists had observed that some chemical carcinogens interact with DNA (Auerback and Robson 1944, 1946; Schull 1962).