chemical fire extinguisher

chemical fire extinguisher

[′kem·i·kəl ′fīr ik′stiŋ·gwish·ər]
(chemical engineering)
Any of three types of fire extinguishers (vaporizing liquid, carbon dioxide, and dry chemical) which expel chemicals in solid, liquid, or gaseous form to blanket or smother a fire.
References in periodicals archive ?
dry chemical fire extinguisher can fire a plume of white powder up to 20 feet.
In 1912, the town had purchased 35 hand-held fire extinguishers and a 40-gallon chemical fire extinguisher mounted on wheels, according to a history of the Auburn Fire Department written by Selectman Kenneth A.
Attempts to put out the flames with a dry chemical fire extinguisher were unsuccessful.
A dry chemical fire extinguisher (not water) works on grease fires as well.
A suspicious substance found scattered throughout one of the churches has been identified by a hazardous materials team as powder from a chemical fire extinguisher.
Always keep a chemical fire extinguisher in the house.
Never purchase an ABC dry chemical fire extinguisher with a content weight of under eight pounds.
For electrical fires, use a dry chemical fire extinguisher to put out a fire if the appliance is still plugged in.
Firefighters had hoses charged and ready to go at the doorstep of the single-family house at 120 North Brookfield Road, but were able to put out the fire with a dry chemical fire extinguisher.
Keep a chemical fire extinguisher in the home at all times and remember, never try to douse a fire in an electrical appliance by using water.
Fire extinguisher: A dry chemical fire extinguisher is appropriate for electrical fires, so purchase one and keep it safely stored nearby.
Someone broke into the Taylor Burn cabin and proceeded to smash appliances with an ax, break glass out of cabinets, cut up furniture, ruin winter provisions and spray a chemical fire extinguisher over the mess.