chemical shift


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chemical shift

[′kem·i·kəl ′shift]
(physical chemistry)
Shift in a nuclear magnetic-resonance spectrum resulting from diamagnetic shielding of the nuclei by the surrounding electrons.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the solid-state, NMR lines are broadened by nuclear spin dipole-dipole interactions and anisotropic chemical shift.
However, Cornelis and colleagues (3) have explored the possibility that absence of central area signal inversion or the presence of a signal drop on chemical shift MRI may assist in ruling out oncocytomas.
Additive Arrangement Gradient Echo (ADAGE) uses combinations of multiple echoes to create high SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) and CNR (Contrast to Noise Ratio) images with reduced chemical shift - improved grey/white matter differentiation and fluid/cartilage visualization.
For example, a lesion-to-spleen chemical shift ratio can be calculated with upper diagnostic threshold set at 0.
Carbon has a large chemical shift range of approximately 250 ppm and using composite pulse decoupling there is usually a single peak per carbon atom in the molecule making carbon spectra much more informative than proton spectra.
The chemical shift tells which types of atoms are there, while the intensity speaks to how many there are.
Chemical shift imaging is the principal technique employed in the MR evaluation of adrenal lesions using in-and out-of-phase techniques, and exploits the presence of abundant intracellular lipid in adenomas that helps to distinguish them from non-adenomatous lesions.
2008) compiled a heteronuclear single quantum coherence-based metabolite chemical shift database that contains only NMR spectra of standard compounds measured under standardized conditions.
where [zeta]H is the chemical shift of the protons on saturated carbon to be calculated; A is a constant with the values of 0.
Chemical shift values of different carbon atoms of selected resins were assigned (Table 3) and compared with published articles (Pizzi 1994, No and Kim 2004).